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Declaration of Universal Humanity

Declaration of Universal Humanity positions 13:1 Spring 2005 itself against Iraq. Resolution 678 of the U.N. Security Council also forbids any country from attacking another country without the consent of the Security Council. This crushing of Iraq has been carried out even after that country has endured ten years of economic sanctions, which have already caused suffering for millions of Iraqi civilians, especially children and women, because those sanctions included the destruction of facilities that made access to clean water possible. The enforcement of the economic sanctions itself directly contradicts the supplementary protocols of the 1977 Geneva Conventions on the rules of war, which forbid economic penalties for civilians as a method of war. These economic sanctions have probably caused the deaths of more Iraqis than the deaths that have been caused by what are called the weapons of mass destruction.3 Now the indescribable suffering of the Iraqi people will increase with the devastation of that country by the most destructive weapons ever known to mankind. The excuse put forward by the American government states that the Iraqi regime has been developing weapons of mass destruction (chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons) that threaten international peace. This excuse continues to be used despite http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Declaration of Universal Humanity

positions asia critique , Volume 13 (1) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-13-1-121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 13:1 Spring 2005 itself against Iraq. Resolution 678 of the U.N. Security Council also forbids any country from attacking another country without the consent of the Security Council. This crushing of Iraq has been carried out even after that country has endured ten years of economic sanctions, which have already caused suffering for millions of Iraqi civilians, especially children and women, because those sanctions included the destruction of facilities that made access to clean water possible. The enforcement of the economic sanctions itself directly contradicts the supplementary protocols of the 1977 Geneva Conventions on the rules of war, which forbid economic penalties for civilians as a method of war. These economic sanctions have probably caused the deaths of more Iraqis than the deaths that have been caused by what are called the weapons of mass destruction.3 Now the indescribable suffering of the Iraqi people will increase with the devastation of that country by the most destructive weapons ever known to mankind. The excuse put forward by the American government states that the Iraqi regime has been developing weapons of mass destruction (chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons) that threaten international peace. This excuse continues to be used despite

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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