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David Kraehenbuehl Prize

David Kraehenbuehl Prize Some of us might have a tendency to drift off during those "notoriously formulaic" recitative passages especially within opera performances, while looking forward to the next gorgeous aria or ensemble. Thanks to the work of Sherrill and Boyle, we'll be listening to recitatives more carefully at the next opportunity. Their very readable account provides an immediately useful typology of recitative gestures. As the authors thoroughly acknowledge, individual recitative gestures have been identified by others; Sherrill and Boyle are the first to create an inventory of the fifteen most common stock formulas, or schemas, that arise in recitatives from diverse vocal and instrumental genres in music ranging from Cesti, Carissimi, Handel, Galuppi, Gluck, Haydn, and Mozart to Beethoven, Rossini, Bellini, Mendelssohn, Wagner, and Stravinsky. The authors lay forth prototypical schema characteristics as bases for their categorizations-- morphological (contour) features, types of harmonic (continuo) support, semantic associations (for a few cases), and syntactic roles within phrase structures expressing initiatory, medial, and closing functions. They range widely through many relevant topics, including discussions of poetic meter, libretti, symbolism, repertoire, and contemporary treatises, and their scholarly apparatus references a wide range of scholarship, both historical and theoretical. They make the character of the schemas vivid by colorful, text-associated names and typical schema roles, placed in playful analogy with actions (ruff and finesse) in old-fashioned card games. The gestures are clear and so recognizable, and so immediately applicable, that we imagine the article will be frequently cited. Sherrill and Boyle's fine analysis of scenes from the first act of Mozart's Così fan tutte demonstrates what can happen to this distinct, "forgotten" recitative language in the dramatic imagination of an ingenious composer. Journal of Music Theory 61:1, April 2017 DOI 10.1215/00222909-3890701 © 2017 by Yale University Published by Duke University Press http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

David Kraehenbuehl Prize

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 61 (1) – Apr 1, 2017

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-3890701
Publisher site
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Abstract

Some of us might have a tendency to drift off during those "notoriously formulaic" recitative passages especially within opera performances, while looking forward to the next gorgeous aria or ensemble. Thanks to the work of Sherrill and Boyle, we'll be listening to recitatives more carefully at the next opportunity. Their very readable account provides an immediately useful typology of recitative gestures. As the authors thoroughly acknowledge, individual recitative gestures have been identified by others; Sherrill and Boyle are the first to create an inventory of the fifteen most common stock formulas, or schemas, that arise in recitatives from diverse vocal and instrumental genres in music ranging from Cesti, Carissimi, Handel, Galuppi, Gluck, Haydn, and Mozart to Beethoven, Rossini, Bellini, Mendelssohn, Wagner, and Stravinsky. The authors lay forth prototypical schema characteristics as bases for their categorizations-- morphological (contour) features, types of harmonic (continuo) support, semantic associations (for a few cases), and syntactic roles within phrase structures expressing initiatory, medial, and closing functions. They range widely through many relevant topics, including discussions of poetic meter, libretti, symbolism, repertoire, and contemporary treatises, and their scholarly apparatus references a wide range of scholarship, both historical and theoretical. They make the character of the schemas vivid by colorful, text-associated names and typical schema roles, placed in playful analogy with actions (ruff and finesse) in old-fashioned card games. The gestures are clear and so recognizable, and so immediately applicable, that we imagine the article will be frequently cited. Sherrill and Boyle's fine analysis of scenes from the first act of Mozart's Così fan tutte demonstrates what can happen to this distinct, "forgotten" recitative language in the dramatic imagination of an ingenious composer. Journal of Music Theory 61:1, April 2017 DOI 10.1215/00222909-3890701 © 2017 by Yale University Published by Duke University Press

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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