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Dante's Pilgrimage in Dorothy Richardson

Dante's Pilgrimage in Dorothy Richardson This article analyzes Dante's presence in Dorothy Richardson's novel series Pilgrimage , focusing on Interim and making references to Deadlock and Revolving Lights. It argues that, although his words are never quoted directly, Dante is a strong presence in the novel and a revealing case study for understanding the complex theories of intertextuality at work in Pilgrimage . Dante is never an authoritative source to be used “as a code or a weapon … to crush someone,” but contributes instead to shaping the novel's reluctance to transform literary precedents in measurable cultural value. The article explores the significance of the “Dante lecture”; looks at how Pilgrimage throws a bridge across modernist experimentalism and the nineteenth century by engaging in a complex dialogue with Philip Wicksteed's theories of political economy; and focuses on the ironic ways in which Interim links Dante to gender via the figure of an almost invisible female translator, Wilhelmina Kuenen. Dorothy Richardson Dante theories of intertextuality history of political economy gender and feminism http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Dante's Pilgrimage in Dorothy Richardson

Comparative Literature , Volume 69 (1) – Mar 1, 2017

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3794631
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article analyzes Dante's presence in Dorothy Richardson's novel series Pilgrimage , focusing on Interim and making references to Deadlock and Revolving Lights. It argues that, although his words are never quoted directly, Dante is a strong presence in the novel and a revealing case study for understanding the complex theories of intertextuality at work in Pilgrimage . Dante is never an authoritative source to be used “as a code or a weapon … to crush someone,” but contributes instead to shaping the novel's reluctance to transform literary precedents in measurable cultural value. The article explores the significance of the “Dante lecture”; looks at how Pilgrimage throws a bridge across modernist experimentalism and the nineteenth century by engaging in a complex dialogue with Philip Wicksteed's theories of political economy; and focuses on the ironic ways in which Interim links Dante to gender via the figure of an almost invisible female translator, Wilhelmina Kuenen. Dorothy Richardson Dante theories of intertextuality history of political economy gender and feminism

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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