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CURRICULUM VITAE: An Authorial Aside

CURRICULUM VITAE: An Authorial Aside Page 1 An Authorial Aside Caroline Walker We might, I have often thought, gauge cultural change best simply by asking how people at various points in the past would have answered the question, “Who are you?” For the answer — the wife of Livius, the man of Guillaume, a servant of God, an Englishman, a butcher, a sinner, an employee of General Motors, a woman—takes us deep into social structure, values, and culture. It matters, then, that my own answer to this question — and not only for the purposes at hand — can be: I am a historian of the religion and culture of Western Europe in the period between the principate of Augustus and the Council of Trent. But what does that mean as an answer? One elaboration might be: I am the author of a set of books on the European Middle Ages. For surely, taken together, the contents of these books reflect what I “do,” although at first glance their range may seem less to provide a definition than to suggest an almost dilettantish curiosity. Nevertheless, it is a place to start. What have I done in my books? What do they suggest I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

CURRICULUM VITAE: An Authorial Aside

Common Knowledge , Volume 9 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-9-1-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 1 An Authorial Aside Caroline Walker We might, I have often thought, gauge cultural change best simply by asking how people at various points in the past would have answered the question, “Who are you?” For the answer — the wife of Livius, the man of Guillaume, a servant of God, an Englishman, a butcher, a sinner, an employee of General Motors, a woman—takes us deep into social structure, values, and culture. It matters, then, that my own answer to this question — and not only for the purposes at hand — can be: I am a historian of the religion and culture of Western Europe in the period between the principate of Augustus and the Council of Trent. But what does that mean as an answer? One elaboration might be: I am the author of a set of books on the European Middle Ages. For surely, taken together, the contents of these books reflect what I “do,” although at first glance their range may seem less to provide a definition than to suggest an almost dilettantish curiosity. Nevertheless, it is a place to start. What have I done in my books? What do they suggest I

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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