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Contributors

Contributors ANNE BURKUS-CHASSON is associate professor of art history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research concentrates on the painting and print culture of late imperial China. She is particularly interested in examining how words and visual images variously interact in illustrated books and inscribed paintings from the late Ming period. Her first book, Through a Forest of Chancellors: Fugitive Histories in Liu Yuan’s “Lingyan ge,” an Illustrated Book from Seventeenth-Century Suzhou (2010), considers how Liu Yuan manipulated both contemporary reading practices and contemporary viewing practices to articulate a proposition about loyalty, a proposition that embraced the ambiguities and complications that characterized the political situation of the 1660s. Her second book, in progress, examines the intersection between print and painting in Chen Hongshou’swork. Recently, having become engaged in the environmental humanities, she is also working on a reevaluation of Qi Biaojia’s various writings about his famous garden at Yushan. ZONG-QI CAI is professor of Chinese, comparative literature, and medieval studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Lee Wing-tat Chair Professor of Chinese literature at Lingnan University of Hong Kong. His recent publications include two forthcoming monographs in Chinese, titled Grammar and Poetic Vision: An Anatomy of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture Duke University Press

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press
ISSN
2329-0048
eISSN
2329-0056
DOI
10.1215/23290048-7568605
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANNE BURKUS-CHASSON is associate professor of art history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research concentrates on the painting and print culture of late imperial China. She is particularly interested in examining how words and visual images variously interact in illustrated books and inscribed paintings from the late Ming period. Her first book, Through a Forest of Chancellors: Fugitive Histories in Liu Yuan’s “Lingyan ge,” an Illustrated Book from Seventeenth-Century Suzhou (2010), considers how Liu Yuan manipulated both contemporary reading practices and contemporary viewing practices to articulate a proposition about loyalty, a proposition that embraced the ambiguities and complications that characterized the political situation of the 1660s. Her second book, in progress, examines the intersection between print and painting in Chen Hongshou’swork. Recently, having become engaged in the environmental humanities, she is also working on a reevaluation of Qi Biaojia’s various writings about his famous garden at Yushan. ZONG-QI CAI is professor of Chinese, comparative literature, and medieval studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Lee Wing-tat Chair Professor of Chinese literature at Lingnan University of Hong Kong. His recent publications include two forthcoming monographs in Chinese, titled Grammar and Poetic Vision: An Anatomy of

Journal

Journal of Chinese Literature and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2019

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