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Colonialism and the Sciences of the Tropical Zone: The Academic Analysis of Difference in "the Island Peoples"

Colonialism and the Sciences of the Tropical Zone: The Academic Analysis of Difference in "the... positions 3:2 Fall 1995 T h e postcolonial condition in those countries is a situation in which the notion that the empire disappeared after the war is gradually being exposed by the destabilization of recently developed nation-states. This is probably also a process in which the postwar national consciousness, which was formed as memories of empire were forgotten, ceaselessly reawakens to those memories. From his understanding of the postwar world order as a new continuation of colonialism, Masao Miyoshi questions the ability of academic discourse to inscribe this situation.* While this is a problem for the recently popular variety of studies related to cultural difference, it first and foremost calls for another critical examination of the relationship between colonialism and academic discourse. My attempt to deal with academic discourse in the Southern Islands (nan’yoguntd)controlled by Japan over the thirty years from their military occupation in 1914 to their “shattering jewel” demises (gyo&az) in World War 11, is based on this problematic. What we need to be careful of is that this kind of examination does not end as a mere inquiry into whether scientific research was used in the control of the colonies. This understanding of academics as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Colonialism and the Sciences of the Tropical Zone: The Academic Analysis of Difference in "the Island Peoples"

positions asia critique , Volume 3 (2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-3-2-367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 3:2 Fall 1995 T h e postcolonial condition in those countries is a situation in which the notion that the empire disappeared after the war is gradually being exposed by the destabilization of recently developed nation-states. This is probably also a process in which the postwar national consciousness, which was formed as memories of empire were forgotten, ceaselessly reawakens to those memories. From his understanding of the postwar world order as a new continuation of colonialism, Masao Miyoshi questions the ability of academic discourse to inscribe this situation.* While this is a problem for the recently popular variety of studies related to cultural difference, it first and foremost calls for another critical examination of the relationship between colonialism and academic discourse. My attempt to deal with academic discourse in the Southern Islands (nan’yoguntd)controlled by Japan over the thirty years from their military occupation in 1914 to their “shattering jewel” demises (gyo&az) in World War 11, is based on this problematic. What we need to be careful of is that this kind of examination does not end as a mere inquiry into whether scientific research was used in the control of the colonies. This understanding of academics as

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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