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Clothing and Power on the Periphery of Empire: The Costumes of the Indigenous People of Taiwan

Clothing and Power on the Periphery of Empire: The Costumes of the Indigenous People of Taiwan positions 11:2 Fall 2003 Figure 1 Lien Chao-mei, Glass-Plate Images: Collected Materials of the Department of Anthropology, 1929–1932 (Taipei: National Taiwan University Press, 1998), pl. 69. Courtesy National Taiwan University want to appear in this costume. Figure 1 shows a group of Atayal men and one woman photographed about 1930. The pale jackets of the men with decorative bands on the arms are clearly related to the clothing worn by Atayal men in the 1990s. These two photos might well lead us to question the authenticity of the costumes worn in the 1990s. If, on the other hand, we turn our attention to the posture of the two groups of men, we see quite a different process. Members of the earlier group stand submissively in front of the camera with their hands by their sides or clasped in front of them. Behind them is a Japanese building, a symbol of colonial rule in this remote part of Taiwan. By contrast the men in the 1990s sit squarely, legs apart, hands on their knees, in a posture familiar from the iconography of dominant Chinese males. Their attention is focused not on the photographer but on the ritual Harrison Clothing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Clothing and Power on the Periphery of Empire: The Costumes of the Indigenous People of Taiwan

positions asia critique , Volume 11 (2) – Sep 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-11-2-331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 11:2 Fall 2003 Figure 1 Lien Chao-mei, Glass-Plate Images: Collected Materials of the Department of Anthropology, 1929–1932 (Taipei: National Taiwan University Press, 1998), pl. 69. Courtesy National Taiwan University want to appear in this costume. Figure 1 shows a group of Atayal men and one woman photographed about 1930. The pale jackets of the men with decorative bands on the arms are clearly related to the clothing worn by Atayal men in the 1990s. These two photos might well lead us to question the authenticity of the costumes worn in the 1990s. If, on the other hand, we turn our attention to the posture of the two groups of men, we see quite a different process. Members of the earlier group stand submissively in front of the camera with their hands by their sides or clasped in front of them. Behind them is a Japanese building, a symbol of colonial rule in this remote part of Taiwan. By contrast the men in the 1990s sit squarely, legs apart, hands on their knees, in a posture familiar from the iconography of dominant Chinese males. Their attention is focused not on the photographer but on the ritual Harrison Clothing

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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