Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CHRISTIANITY AND THE DEATH OF GOD: A Response to Cardinal Lustiger

CHRISTIANITY AND THE DEATH OF GOD: A Response to Cardinal Lustiger Santiago Cardinal Lustiger is among the most thoughtful members of the Catholic hierarchy at the present time. His defense here of universal reason, when he could have written in defense of his universal faith, would have been inspirational for non-Catholic and even secular intellectuals at an earlier point in history. Given the direction that philosophy has taken, especially Continental philosophy, over the past several decades, Cardinal Lustiger’s appeal to the Western rationalist tradition comes at a time when, as he clearly regrets, professors of philosophy will not, overall, be sympathetic to his remarks. He calls on philosophers (presumably people like me and my teacher Gianni Vattimo and—were he still with us— Vattimo’s teacher Hans-Georg Gadamer) to justify our doubts about the capacity of philosophical reasoning to found universal rights and truths. A curious pass is reached, historically, when a prince of the church, the primate of France, is advised by a teacher of philosophy in Rome that rights and truths require no validation except faith—indeed can acquire no other validation. Occasionally, a philosopher who wants to assert universal claims will turn for precedents to Christian thinkers but will do so in pursuit of secular aims (a recent example http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

CHRISTIANITY AND THE DEATH OF GOD: A Response to Cardinal Lustiger

Common Knowledge , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/christianity-and-the-death-of-god-a-response-to-cardinal-lustiger-MlFkJSRI0u
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-11-1-33
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Santiago Cardinal Lustiger is among the most thoughtful members of the Catholic hierarchy at the present time. His defense here of universal reason, when he could have written in defense of his universal faith, would have been inspirational for non-Catholic and even secular intellectuals at an earlier point in history. Given the direction that philosophy has taken, especially Continental philosophy, over the past several decades, Cardinal Lustiger’s appeal to the Western rationalist tradition comes at a time when, as he clearly regrets, professors of philosophy will not, overall, be sympathetic to his remarks. He calls on philosophers (presumably people like me and my teacher Gianni Vattimo and—were he still with us— Vattimo’s teacher Hans-Georg Gadamer) to justify our doubts about the capacity of philosophical reasoning to found universal rights and truths. A curious pass is reached, historically, when a prince of the church, the primate of France, is advised by a teacher of philosophy in Rome that rights and truths require no validation except faith—indeed can acquire no other validation. Occasionally, a philosopher who wants to assert universal claims will turn for precedents to Christian thinkers but will do so in pursuit of secular aims (a recent example

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.