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CHICK COREA'S 1984 PERFORMANCE OF "NIGHT AND DAY"

CHICK COREA'S 1984 PERFORMANCE OF "NIGHT AND DAY" Example 1. “Tones for Joan’s Bones.” Transcribed from Blue Mitchell, Boss Horn (1966, Blue Note BST 84257) “Litha,” by Chick Corea, from Chick Corea Collection (Hal Leonard Corp., 1994), 114. (Original “∆” given here as “maj 7”) | Dmaj7 | C≥mi7 | Bmaj7 | B≤mi7 | A≤maj7 | Gmi7 | Fmaj7 | | | | Dmaj7 | | | | | E≤maj7 | | Cmaj7 | Table 1 for chromatic third relationships involving major seventh chords. For example, the first harmonic movement in “Tones for Joan’s Bones” takes place between major seventh chords on I and ≤VI (Example 1a).3 This is followed in mm. 17–22 by three pairs of major seventh chords related by an ascending minor third (bracketed in Example 1b). These last progressions are nonfunctional, and represent part of a general trend toward increasing use of nonfunctional progressions in jazz at that time. As another example, the opening progression of “Litha” consists of chromatic third relationships between pairs of major seventh chords related by a descending minor third (bracketed in Table 1).4 This interest in juxtaposing major seventh chords that are in a chromatic third relation carries through into Corea’s approach to “Night and Day.” The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

CHICK COREA'S 1984 PERFORMANCE OF "NIGHT AND DAY"

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (2) – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-2-257
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Example 1. “Tones for Joan’s Bones.” Transcribed from Blue Mitchell, Boss Horn (1966, Blue Note BST 84257) “Litha,” by Chick Corea, from Chick Corea Collection (Hal Leonard Corp., 1994), 114. (Original “∆” given here as “maj 7”) | Dmaj7 | C≥mi7 | Bmaj7 | B≤mi7 | A≤maj7 | Gmi7 | Fmaj7 | | | | Dmaj7 | | | | | E≤maj7 | | Cmaj7 | Table 1 for chromatic third relationships involving major seventh chords. For example, the first harmonic movement in “Tones for Joan’s Bones” takes place between major seventh chords on I and ≤VI (Example 1a).3 This is followed in mm. 17–22 by three pairs of major seventh chords related by an ascending minor third (bracketed in Example 1b). These last progressions are nonfunctional, and represent part of a general trend toward increasing use of nonfunctional progressions in jazz at that time. As another example, the opening progression of “Litha” consists of chromatic third relationships between pairs of major seventh chords related by a descending minor third (bracketed in Table 1).4 This interest in juxtaposing major seventh chords that are in a chromatic third relation carries through into Corea’s approach to “Night and Day.” The

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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