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CHASING RAINBOWS: WOLF'S "PHANOMEN" AND IDEAS OF COHERENCE

CHASING RAINBOWS: WOLF'S "PHANOMEN" AND IDEAS OF COHERENCE main of pitch.2 My approach is multivalent inso as I do not assume that every analytical finding must somehow support or late to every other finding.3 I. Issues of Tonal Unity: Monotonality vs. Dictional Tonality The terms “monotonality,” as used by Schoenrg, and “tonality” (Tonalität), as Schenker unstood it, convey very similar meanings, but a psentative of diffent analytical systems. th terms signify the condition un which all the pitch content, including every modulation, no matter how distant, is ultimately surdinate to a single tonic.4 Schoenrg explains monotonality by means of the “chart of the gions” (1969, 20). Schenker, on the other hand, gards a tonally unified piece (in most cases) as an elaration of an Ursatz. But if a piece gins and ends in diffent keys, then the harmonic-contrapuntal structu may based, from a Schenkerian standpoint, on some other model than the Ursatz, such as an auxiliary cadence or a plagal cadence, to name two possibilities.5 Pieces based on these models differ from those based on an Ursatz in that they psent the structural tonic as a goal, but not as a point of departu.6 Furthermo, they often lack a complete descent of the fundamental line from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

CHASING RAINBOWS: WOLF'S "PHANOMEN" AND IDEAS OF COHERENCE

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 45 (2) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-45-2-233
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

main of pitch.2 My approach is multivalent inso as I do not assume that every analytical finding must somehow support or late to every other finding.3 I. Issues of Tonal Unity: Monotonality vs. Dictional Tonality The terms “monotonality,” as used by Schoenrg, and “tonality” (Tonalität), as Schenker unstood it, convey very similar meanings, but a psentative of diffent analytical systems. th terms signify the condition un which all the pitch content, including every modulation, no matter how distant, is ultimately surdinate to a single tonic.4 Schoenrg explains monotonality by means of the “chart of the gions” (1969, 20). Schenker, on the other hand, gards a tonally unified piece (in most cases) as an elaration of an Ursatz. But if a piece gins and ends in diffent keys, then the harmonic-contrapuntal structu may based, from a Schenkerian standpoint, on some other model than the Ursatz, such as an auxiliary cadence or a plagal cadence, to name two possibilities.5 Pieces based on these models differ from those based on an Ursatz in that they psent the structural tonic as a goal, but not as a point of departu.6 Furthermo, they often lack a complete descent of the fundamental line from

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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