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Charles Edward Ives—Theologian in Music

Charles Edward Ives—Theologian in Music Charles Edward Ives­ Theologian in Music fames W Mcclendon, fr. By now the music of Charles Ives is as familiar to concertgoers as that of any American composer. His Concord Sonata for piano and his great Fourth Symphony have become part of the standard fare. It is also known, at least to musicians, that this acclaim represents a profound shift in musical taste for which Ives himself is partly responsible, for during the years when he was actively composing them (1895-1915) he was unable to have any of his major works per­ formed in public. Thus he endured many years of apparent total fail­ ure in music prior to his ultimate success. Ives's musical innova­ tions include radical departures from traditional harmony and tonality: "discord" is music, too. They also include use of materials drawn from the sounds of America: rural nature, city streets, march­ ing bands, Stephen Foster melodies, and "What a Friend We Have in Jesus"-the whole without precedent in serious composition. Those who have studied his biography know that during the years of composition Ives devoted himself also to the insurance business and made a fortune in it, and that later he wrote short but passionate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Charles Edward Ives—Theologian in Music

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Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-8.1.109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Charles Edward Ives­ Theologian in Music fames W Mcclendon, fr. By now the music of Charles Ives is as familiar to concertgoers as that of any American composer. His Concord Sonata for piano and his great Fourth Symphony have become part of the standard fare. It is also known, at least to musicians, that this acclaim represents a profound shift in musical taste for which Ives himself is partly responsible, for during the years when he was actively composing them (1895-1915) he was unable to have any of his major works per­ formed in public. Thus he endured many years of apparent total fail­ ure in music prior to his ultimate success. Ives's musical innova­ tions include radical departures from traditional harmony and tonality: "discord" is music, too. They also include use of materials drawn from the sounds of America: rural nature, city streets, march­ ing bands, Stephen Foster melodies, and "What a Friend We Have in Jesus"-the whole without precedent in serious composition. Those who have studied his biography know that during the years of composition Ives devoted himself also to the insurance business and made a fortune in it, and that later he wrote short but passionate

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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