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Charitable Hatred: Tolerance and Intolerance in England, 1500 - 1700

Charitable Hatred: Tolerance and Intolerance in England, 1500 - 1700 16:1 © 2010 by Duke University Press would define the Israeli collective psyche, yet very little of what Schantz describes as occurring in American culture after the Civil War is apparent in the current mood of my country. Obviously, the passing of almost 150 years since the Civil War defeats any attempt to establish parallels. At least in the West, to which the dominant culture of Israel still belongs, it appears that the way in which people view death and life has changed dramatically in that time. But there is also a perhaps-underestimated religious difference between the attitudes of Christians and Jews toward war and death. We sometimes speak now of Judeo-Christian morality or even culture, and Judaism, like Christianity, involves a belief in afterlife existence and the rising of the dead at the end of days. Still, for Jews that is a much more abstract notion than the “comforting and compelling vision of eternal life” that Schantz describes as prevalent in nineteenth-century America. Ezekiel 37:1 – 14, the most famous prophecy in the Hebrew Bible of the rising of the dead, imagines it as a clattering assembly of dry bones. And for most Jews, the life after http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Charitable Hatred: Tolerance and Intolerance in England, 1500 - 1700

Common Knowledge , Volume 16 (1) – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2010 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754x-2009-084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

16:1 © 2010 by Duke University Press would define the Israeli collective psyche, yet very little of what Schantz describes as occurring in American culture after the Civil War is apparent in the current mood of my country. Obviously, the passing of almost 150 years since the Civil War defeats any attempt to establish parallels. At least in the West, to which the dominant culture of Israel still belongs, it appears that the way in which people view death and life has changed dramatically in that time. But there is also a perhaps-underestimated religious difference between the attitudes of Christians and Jews toward war and death. We sometimes speak now of Judeo-Christian morality or even culture, and Judaism, like Christianity, involves a belief in afterlife existence and the rising of the dead at the end of days. Still, for Jews that is a much more abstract notion than the “comforting and compelling vision of eternal life” that Schantz describes as prevalent in nineteenth-century America. Ezekiel 37:1 – 14, the most famous prophecy in the Hebrew Bible of the rising of the dead, imagines it as a clattering assembly of dry bones. And for most Jews, the life after

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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