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Chapter 8. Wrong Roads

Chapter 8. Wrong Roads Chapter 8 Wrong Roads The great number of books that have been written about the Negro and his songs is constantly increasing, as the addition of this volume suggests. The attitude of most of the authors has been to create interest in a fascinating subject. Many of the books deal with the Negro through the words of the songs he creates, in a sense permit­ ting the Negro to tell his own story. This is good from a purely soci­ ological point of view, but it obviously represents only half of the Then there is the writer who seems more creative side of the Negro. inclined to view the songs through his own eyes and write a more personal reaction to his observations, but such an account runs the risk of being fictional. Finally, there is the type of book that deals with the song of the Negro as a whole by presenting to the reader its melody, poetry, and interpretation. This latter would seem to be the most desirable from a general point of view. The most difficult element of song to handle, insofar as the general public is concerned, is the music. My feeling is that, although http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 8. Wrong Roads

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.162
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 8 Wrong Roads The great number of books that have been written about the Negro and his songs is constantly increasing, as the addition of this volume suggests. The attitude of most of the authors has been to create interest in a fascinating subject. Many of the books deal with the Negro through the words of the songs he creates, in a sense permit­ ting the Negro to tell his own story. This is good from a purely soci­ ological point of view, but it obviously represents only half of the Then there is the writer who seems more creative side of the Negro. inclined to view the songs through his own eyes and write a more personal reaction to his observations, but such an account runs the risk of being fictional. Finally, there is the type of book that deals with the song of the Negro as a whole by presenting to the reader its melody, poetry, and interpretation. This latter would seem to be the most desirable from a general point of view. The most difficult element of song to handle, insofar as the general public is concerned, is the music. My feeling is that, although

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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