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Chapter 7. “De Stars in de Elements”

Chapter 7. “De Stars in de Elements” Chapter 7 "De Stars in de Elements" Where do Negro songs originate? This question is becoming harder to deal with as the years go by. It is a question that might well be left alone if it were asked merely to satisfy a querious urge. It becomes another matter when it is asked by the interested collector or scholar who wishes to attach the proper historical and sociological under­ standing to a song or group of songs. It also becomes very important in the matter of directing research, so that one's research will have as little lost motion-time and expense-as possible. First of all, it should be understood that some localities produce large numbers of songs, while others produce moderate numbers, and still others scarcely produce at all in comparison with the more productive areas. These conditions are mainly the result of social forces operat­ ing in various ways in a very inconstant series of situations. Where Negroes are brought together in a situation that requires them to rely mainly on each other for interest and recreation, the production of songs of a secular as well as a religious type is likely to be greater than in situations where http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 7. “De Stars in de Elements”

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 7 "De Stars in de Elements" Where do Negro songs originate? This question is becoming harder to deal with as the years go by. It is a question that might well be left alone if it were asked merely to satisfy a querious urge. It becomes another matter when it is asked by the interested collector or scholar who wishes to attach the proper historical and sociological under­ standing to a song or group of songs. It also becomes very important in the matter of directing research, so that one's research will have as little lost motion-time and expense-as possible. First of all, it should be understood that some localities produce large numbers of songs, while others produce moderate numbers, and still others scarcely produce at all in comparison with the more productive areas. These conditions are mainly the result of social forces operat­ ing in various ways in a very inconstant series of situations. Where Negroes are brought together in a situation that requires them to rely mainly on each other for interest and recreation, the production of songs of a secular as well as a religious type is likely to be greater than in situations where

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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