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Chapter 4. The Rise of the Work Songs

Chapter 4. The Rise of the Work Songs Chapter 4 The Rise ol the Work Songs The philosophy, beauty, and grandeur of the Negro work song has been largely overlooked until very recently. This is the result of neglect, on the one hand, and circumstances inherent in the system producing the work song, on the other. In the first place, those who came south to help the Negro out of his blighted depths were very religious people who were anxious to see the very best and noblest virtues in their charges and to show these virtues to the world in a manner intended to impress others who would be willing to let down a ladder upon which the Negro might begin his climb upward. Con­ sequently, the religious songs received all of the attention from these early benefactors. To say that these fine people were correct in estab­ lishing the spirituals and jubilees as the forefront of the Negro's musical creation is to deal in platitudes. They are generally agreed to be the best and noblest of the many Negro folk songs (a point not agreed to by all), but they were and are not the only true, significant, and important of the songs emanating from the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 4. The Rise of the Work Songs

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.66
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 4 The Rise ol the Work Songs The philosophy, beauty, and grandeur of the Negro work song has been largely overlooked until very recently. This is the result of neglect, on the one hand, and circumstances inherent in the system producing the work song, on the other. In the first place, those who came south to help the Negro out of his blighted depths were very religious people who were anxious to see the very best and noblest virtues in their charges and to show these virtues to the world in a manner intended to impress others who would be willing to let down a ladder upon which the Negro might begin his climb upward. Con­ sequently, the religious songs received all of the attention from these early benefactors. To say that these fine people were correct in estab­ lishing the spirituals and jubilees as the forefront of the Negro's musical creation is to deal in platitudes. They are generally agreed to be the best and noblest of the many Negro folk songs (a point not agreed to by all), but they were and are not the only true, significant, and important of the songs emanating from the

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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