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Chapter 14. The Great Fantasia

Chapter 14. The Great Fantasia Chapter 14 The Great Fantasia It is natural that a race that produces its own folk music in quantity and quality would also produce composers, authors, poets, singers, and instrumentalists who distinguish themselves in the idiom of the race. It is also natural that this idiomatic expression would be on a plane far beyond the folk concept and therefore beyond the reach and even the comprehension of the masses of the race. These are the "chosen few" whose privilege it is to serve the final purpose of the creative urge in man. Theirs is beyond but not apart from the subject at hand, so that a treatise such as this must take their work into the scope of its consideration. Their contributions, based upon Negro folk art, form a great and enduring fantasia wherein the voice, the written word, the piano, and the orchestra are used. Some of the per­ sonalities treated herein have been partly appraised in previous chap­ ters . If they are mentioned again, it is because a more detailed char­ acterization is sought with regard to their work and its relationship to that of others. Samuel Coleridge-Taylor 11875-1912) was the greatest of the Negro composers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 14. The Great Fantasia

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.230
Publisher site
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Abstract

Chapter 14 The Great Fantasia It is natural that a race that produces its own folk music in quantity and quality would also produce composers, authors, poets, singers, and instrumentalists who distinguish themselves in the idiom of the race. It is also natural that this idiomatic expression would be on a plane far beyond the folk concept and therefore beyond the reach and even the comprehension of the masses of the race. These are the "chosen few" whose privilege it is to serve the final purpose of the creative urge in man. Theirs is beyond but not apart from the subject at hand, so that a treatise such as this must take their work into the scope of its consideration. Their contributions, based upon Negro folk art, form a great and enduring fantasia wherein the voice, the written word, the piano, and the orchestra are used. Some of the per­ sonalities treated herein have been partly appraised in previous chap­ ters . If they are mentioned again, it is because a more detailed char­ acterization is sought with regard to their work and its relationship to that of others. Samuel Coleridge-Taylor 11875-1912) was the greatest of the Negro composers.

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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