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Chapter 13. Urban-Rural Cycle

Chapter 13. Urban-Rural Cycle Chapter 13 Urban-Rural Cycle When considering Negro folk music, one automatically thinks of rural folk, and rightly so. The legend of Negro folk music has devel­ oped around primitive people. The store of tales, true and imagined, which have been current in recent years leaves the common impres­ sion that all Negro folk music was of the past . The bald fact is that Negroes in the city and the small town are forced always to create a in a segregated area city-within-a-city, a town-within-a-town. Being in most cases, Negroes live in a condition that is not a true repre­ sentation of the general life found there. It is Negro life in the city. The Negro area is made up of the usual three socioeconomic classes-lower, middle, and upper. For this study, it is very impor­ tant to look upon these divisions as being folk level, semi-folk level, and super-folk level. Working together, these groups continue to bring about an exchange of songs, back and forth among themselves, which is one of the most interesting and far-reaching developments of which I have taken note. In making extensive tours of the Deep South for the purpose of studying Negro folk http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 13. Urban-Rural Cycle

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 13 Urban-Rural Cycle When considering Negro folk music, one automatically thinks of rural folk, and rightly so. The legend of Negro folk music has devel­ oped around primitive people. The store of tales, true and imagined, which have been current in recent years leaves the common impres­ sion that all Negro folk music was of the past . The bald fact is that Negroes in the city and the small town are forced always to create a in a segregated area city-within-a-city, a town-within-a-town. Being in most cases, Negroes live in a condition that is not a true repre­ sentation of the general life found there. It is Negro life in the city. The Negro area is made up of the usual three socioeconomic classes-lower, middle, and upper. For this study, it is very impor­ tant to look upon these divisions as being folk level, semi-folk level, and super-folk level. Working together, these groups continue to bring about an exchange of songs, back and forth among themselves, which is one of the most interesting and far-reaching developments of which I have taken note. In making extensive tours of the Deep South for the purpose of studying Negro folk

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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