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Chapter 10. Has the Negro Borrowed His Songs?

Chapter 10. Has the Negro Borrowed His Songs? Chapter IO Has the Negro Borrowed His Songs? The great volume of articles and books now being written on the subject of Negro music demonstrates the awareness that its inherent worth has generally awakened. It is doubtful if this folkloric interest finds a parallel in any other country or age known to man. Whereas most of the contributions have been inclined toward genuine appre­ ciation and better understanding, the expected dissenting few have also made their way into print . The great preponderance of construc­ tive work on the side of Negro music prevents the need for a general rebuttal to the claims of some writers who would change the public's mind in regard to the situation. However, there is one claim about the source of the spiritual that has gained a following far out of pro­ portion to its apparent worth-the notion that the Negro borrowed his songs from the white man . In speaking to this subject, let me say that if Africa was incapable of creating the spiritual and the jubilee, so was America until the Negro came upon the scene . Two seem­ ingly divergent continents found a medium in the black man, in whom http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 10. Has the Negro Borrowed His Songs?

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

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Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter IO Has the Negro Borrowed His Songs? The great volume of articles and books now being written on the subject of Negro music demonstrates the awareness that its inherent worth has generally awakened. It is doubtful if this folkloric interest finds a parallel in any other country or age known to man. Whereas most of the contributions have been inclined toward genuine appre­ ciation and better understanding, the expected dissenting few have also made their way into print . The great preponderance of construc­ tive work on the side of Negro music prevents the need for a general rebuttal to the claims of some writers who would change the public's mind in regard to the situation. However, there is one claim about the source of the spiritual that has gained a following far out of pro­ portion to its apparent worth-the notion that the Negro borrowed his songs from the white man . In speaking to this subject, let me say that if Africa was incapable of creating the spiritual and the jubilee, so was America until the Negro came upon the scene . Two seem­ ingly divergent continents found a medium in the black man, in whom

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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