Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Chapter 1. Prelude

Chapter 1. Prelude Chapter I Prelude Negro music is the result of the ways and experiences of the Negro. However, since we are considering the Negro music found here in America-indeed, in so small an area as the southern United States-we are forced to consider a very special series of influences not like those of any other people in the world. It is therefore neces­ sary for the reader to have a brief introduction that deals with the nature of folk music in general. This must be followed by a discus­ sion about the singing ways and customs of Negroes in Africa as well as in America, and a consideration of both of these in relation to the progress of time, which is the great modifier of all of man's activities. Time itself is a rhythmical process. It is the orderly succession of time values which governs all of the vital functions of man's life and the universe. Music is also ordered by this great force. Let us, then, speak of the first half of music-rhythm. The Rhythm Sphere If one stops to consider the fact that he can be sure the sun will rise at a given instant in his locality http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Chapter 1. Prelude

Black Sacred Music , Volume 9 (1-2) – Sep 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/chapter-1-prelude-fJZzInkXxU
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-9.1-2.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter I Prelude Negro music is the result of the ways and experiences of the Negro. However, since we are considering the Negro music found here in America-indeed, in so small an area as the southern United States-we are forced to consider a very special series of influences not like those of any other people in the world. It is therefore neces­ sary for the reader to have a brief introduction that deals with the nature of folk music in general. This must be followed by a discus­ sion about the singing ways and customs of Negroes in Africa as well as in America, and a consideration of both of these in relation to the progress of time, which is the great modifier of all of man's activities. Time itself is a rhythmical process. It is the orderly succession of time values which governs all of the vital functions of man's life and the universe. Music is also ordered by this great force. Let us, then, speak of the first half of music-rhythm. The Rhythm Sphere If one stops to consider the fact that he can be sure the sun will rise at a given instant in his locality

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.