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Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach ed. by Anthony Grafton and Glenn W. Most

Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach ed. by Anthony Grafton and... in the classical repertoire, enabling a “popular cosmopolitanism” that helped to “construct public sanctuaries amidst hostile crowds.” — William Weber doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254072 Anthony Grafton and Glenn W. Most, eds., Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), 388 pp. How is a canon formed and to what treatment is it submitted once it has been accepted? These are the main questions behind the fourteen fascinating articles in this book. The geographical and chronological areas covered are immense — from Europe to China and India, and from the ancient Babylonians to the Christian Hebraists of the sixteenth century — and the display of learning is impressive. Certain constant features, especially in the treatment of texts, emerge. The can- ons themselves tended to be formed by the sanction of an acknowledged autho- r ity, sometimes a ruler, sometimes even scribes or printers. The works were then submitted over the ages to various forms of interpretation. Commentators strug - gled with the problems of obscurity. In their endeavors to correct and improve the texts, or to make them acceptable to a contemporary readership, they often imposed on them a meaning very far from what was originally intended. — Alastair Hamilton doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254084 Jimena Canales, The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate that Changed Our Understanding of Time (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015), 479 pp. Imagine a world without time, if you dare. Now imagine that time has returned to it: what has been lost, what has been gained? The answers trace the rise of authoritative knowledge in the modern world, as it drove a twentieth c -entury wedge between physics and metaphysics, science and philosophy, the “time of the universe” and the “time of our lives.” In a magisterial account of the events leading up to a historic debate in the spring of 1922 between Henri Bergson and Albert Einstein on the meaning of time, Canales brilliantly tracks the birth of the Two Cultures and considers the present reverberations of that divide. Can our intuitions reveal the meaning of time more completely than does our physics? Downloaded from https://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/24/1/167/518235/0240167.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 22 August 2019 L i t t l e R e v i e w s 16 7 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach ed. by Anthony Grafton and Glenn W. Most

Common Knowledge , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-4254084
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Abstract

in the classical repertoire, enabling a “popular cosmopolitanism” that helped to “construct public sanctuaries amidst hostile crowds.” — William Weber doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254072 Anthony Grafton and Glenn W. Most, eds., Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), 388 pp. How is a canon formed and to what treatment is it submitted once it has been accepted? These are the main questions behind the fourteen fascinating articles in this book. The geographical and chronological areas covered are immense — from Europe to China and India, and from the ancient Babylonians to the Christian Hebraists of the sixteenth century — and the display of learning is impressive. Certain constant features, especially in the treatment of texts, emerge. The can- ons themselves tended to be formed by the sanction of an acknowledged autho- r ity, sometimes a ruler, sometimes even scribes or printers. The works were then submitted over the ages to various forms of interpretation. Commentators strug - gled with the problems of obscurity. In their endeavors to correct and improve the texts, or to make them acceptable to a contemporary readership, they often imposed on them a meaning very far from what was originally intended. — Alastair Hamilton doi 10.1215/0961754X-4254084 Jimena Canales, The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate that Changed Our Understanding of Time (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015), 479 pp. Imagine a world without time, if you dare. Now imagine that time has returned to it: what has been lost, what has been gained? The answers trace the rise of authoritative knowledge in the modern world, as it drove a twentieth c -entury wedge between physics and metaphysics, science and philosophy, the “time of the universe” and the “time of our lives.” In a magisterial account of the events leading up to a historic debate in the spring of 1922 between Henri Bergson and Albert Einstein on the meaning of time, Canales brilliantly tracks the birth of the Two Cultures and considers the present reverberations of that divide. Can our intuitions reveal the meaning of time more completely than does our physics? Downloaded from https://read.dukeupress.edu/common-knowledge/article-pdf/24/1/167/518235/0240167.pdf by DEEPDYVE INC user on 22 August 2019 L i t t l e R e v i e w s 16 7

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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