Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Camus, Our Contemporary

Camus, Our Contemporary Comparative Literature 64:3 DOI 10.1215/00104124-1672970 © 2012 by University of Oregon CAMUS, OUR CONTEMPORARY / 317 Today, the life and work of Albert Camus appear to have regained a significant, if not a crucial, place in our intellectual and cultural landscape. To be sure, Camus had already "resurfaced," so to speak, in the mid-1990s, with the posthumous publication of his semi-autobiographical and highly lyrical novel The First Man, which was received with great fanfare on both sides of the Atlantic. Many journalists and pundits in France also seized the opportunity to stress the Algerian writer's renewed "timeliness" and relevance as a political thinker: his passionate critique of, and opposition to, Communism seemed particularly à propos in the wake of the "fall of the wall" in 1989 and the demise of the Soviet Union. Indeed, with the decline and ultimate irrelevance of the French Communist Party, as well as the enormous success of the 1997 Black Book of Communism (which examined in horrific detail the crimes of Communist regimes worldwide), Camus seemed to have the last word in his debates with Communist or fellow-traveling critics from four decades earlier. But today's interest in Camus' life and work appears to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Camus, Our Contemporary

Comparative Literature , Volume 64 (3) – Jun 20, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/camus-our-contemporary-f4TiqxVoI4
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-1672970
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparative Literature 64:3 DOI 10.1215/00104124-1672970 © 2012 by University of Oregon CAMUS, OUR CONTEMPORARY / 317 Today, the life and work of Albert Camus appear to have regained a significant, if not a crucial, place in our intellectual and cultural landscape. To be sure, Camus had already "resurfaced," so to speak, in the mid-1990s, with the posthumous publication of his semi-autobiographical and highly lyrical novel The First Man, which was received with great fanfare on both sides of the Atlantic. Many journalists and pundits in France also seized the opportunity to stress the Algerian writer's renewed "timeliness" and relevance as a political thinker: his passionate critique of, and opposition to, Communism seemed particularly à propos in the wake of the "fall of the wall" in 1989 and the demise of the Soviet Union. Indeed, with the decline and ultimate irrelevance of the French Communist Party, as well as the enormous success of the 1997 Black Book of Communism (which examined in horrific detail the crimes of Communist regimes worldwide), Camus seemed to have the last word in his debates with Communist or fellow-traveling critics from four decades earlier. But today's interest in Camus' life and work appears to

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jun 20, 2012

There are no references for this article.