Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Brides Who Travel: Gender, Transnationalism, and Nationalism in Hindi Film

Brides Who Travel: Gender, Transnationalism, and Nationalism in Hindi Film culture and a fan and avid consumer of Hindi film. Not coincidentally, it is also written from the location of a diasporic woman, a bride who traveled. My positionality as a nonresident Indian (NRI), a woman who moved abroad to live with her husband, and as a feminist with complex and ambivalent relationships with my homeland is inescapable. As a diasporic scholar, I have struggled to construct what I have elsewhere termed a politics of bifocality, a politics of solidarity with and accountability to communities of struggle in both my homes, thus problematizing binaries of home versus diaspora.’ Such a politics of bifocality rests on a negotiation of the fraught relationship between feminist theorizing and activism. This essay is deeply influenced by my experiences with South Asian survivors of domestic violence. Thus, although I resist using these experiences as grist for the academic mill, they shape my perspective as a feminist within the academy, in particular, my pedagogy and my theorizing. Most importantly, my positionality as an activist and as an Indian woman abroad compel me to recognize the importance of discourses of nation and gender for the constitution of diasporic subjectivities. I have learned that such apparently http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Brides Who Travel: Gender, Transnationalism, and Nationalism in Hindi Film

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (3) – Dec 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/brides-who-travel-gender-transnationalism-and-nationalism-in-hindi-Q80o62fsTX

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-3-731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

culture and a fan and avid consumer of Hindi film. Not coincidentally, it is also written from the location of a diasporic woman, a bride who traveled. My positionality as a nonresident Indian (NRI), a woman who moved abroad to live with her husband, and as a feminist with complex and ambivalent relationships with my homeland is inescapable. As a diasporic scholar, I have struggled to construct what I have elsewhere termed a politics of bifocality, a politics of solidarity with and accountability to communities of struggle in both my homes, thus problematizing binaries of home versus diaspora.’ Such a politics of bifocality rests on a negotiation of the fraught relationship between feminist theorizing and activism. This essay is deeply influenced by my experiences with South Asian survivors of domestic violence. Thus, although I resist using these experiences as grist for the academic mill, they shape my perspective as a feminist within the academy, in particular, my pedagogy and my theorizing. Most importantly, my positionality as an activist and as an Indian woman abroad compel me to recognize the importance of discourses of nation and gender for the constitution of diasporic subjectivities. I have learned that such apparently

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.