Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

BODILY HEARING: PHYSIOLOGICAL METAPHORS AND MUSICAL UNDERSTANDING

BODILY HEARING: PHYSIOLOGICAL METAPHORS AND MUSICAL UNDERSTANDING Music, an art which self-evidently does not exist until bodies make it and/or receive it, is thought about as if it were a mind-mind game. Thus when we think analytically about music, what we ordinarily do is describe practices of the mind (the composer’s choices) for the sake of informing the practices of other minds. . . . We end by ignoring the fact that these practices of the mind are nonpractices without the bodily practices they call for—about which it has become unthinkable to think. . . . Metaphorically, we have denied the very thing that makes music music, the thing which gives it such enormous symbolic and sensual power (16). Hearing this produced in me a sense of relief and release, a mental exhalation as it were balancing the actual intake of breath that first brought these issues to the forefront for me, and granting me an even greater surcease from pain. In Cusick’s words, music for the performer is “something you do;” moreover, . . . the score is not the work to a performer; nor is the score-made-sound the work: the work includes the performer’s mobilizing of previously studied skills so as to embody, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

BODILY HEARING: PHYSIOLOGICAL METAPHORS AND MUSICAL UNDERSTANDING

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/bodily-hearing-physiological-metaphors-and-musical-understanding-4lG2mXs7LL
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music, an art which self-evidently does not exist until bodies make it and/or receive it, is thought about as if it were a mind-mind game. Thus when we think analytically about music, what we ordinarily do is describe practices of the mind (the composer’s choices) for the sake of informing the practices of other minds. . . . We end by ignoring the fact that these practices of the mind are nonpractices without the bodily practices they call for—about which it has become unthinkable to think. . . . Metaphorically, we have denied the very thing that makes music music, the thing which gives it such enormous symbolic and sensual power (16). Hearing this produced in me a sense of relief and release, a mental exhalation as it were balancing the actual intake of breath that first brought these issues to the forefront for me, and granting me an even greater surcease from pain. In Cusick’s words, music for the performer is “something you do;” moreover, . . . the score is not the work to a performer; nor is the score-made-sound the work: the work includes the performer’s mobilizing of previously studied skills so as to embody,

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.