Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Beyond an Alliance of Color: The African American Impact on Modern Japan

Beyond an Alliance of Color: The African American Impact on Modern Japan positions 11:1 Spring 2003 visited Japan in 1927, four years earlier than the (all-white) All Star American Major League baseball team.4 Ever since the American media played up derogatory remarks on African Americans by Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party politicians in the 1980s, the public seems to refuse to think any further, but take it for granted that all Japanese are racists who avoid contacts with African American people. It is time to bring to light long-ignored Japanese readings of African American history, literature, and struggle and investigate why the story of Japanese interactions with African Americans has been muted rather than celebrated.5 There are some reasons for the silence. Since the early twentieth century, the unity of the “people of color,” Japanese and African Americans, posed a menace to Washington and also a threat to U.S.-Japanese friendship. The U.S. State Department had suspected and looked hard for evidence that African Americans and Japanese immigrants were forming a racial (antiwhite) conspiracy to stage a revolt against Washington.6 In fact, as Tokyo-Washington diplomacy became estranged in the 1930s, Japanese propaganda called for a trans-Pacific racial alliance between Japanese and African Americans as an anti-American (antiwhite) gesture. Regardless, it is undeniable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Beyond an Alliance of Color: The African American Impact on Modern Japan

positions asia critique , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/beyond-an-alliance-of-color-the-african-american-impact-on-modern-x7iLMKBT5c
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-11-1-183
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

positions 11:1 Spring 2003 visited Japan in 1927, four years earlier than the (all-white) All Star American Major League baseball team.4 Ever since the American media played up derogatory remarks on African Americans by Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party politicians in the 1980s, the public seems to refuse to think any further, but take it for granted that all Japanese are racists who avoid contacts with African American people. It is time to bring to light long-ignored Japanese readings of African American history, literature, and struggle and investigate why the story of Japanese interactions with African Americans has been muted rather than celebrated.5 There are some reasons for the silence. Since the early twentieth century, the unity of the “people of color,” Japanese and African Americans, posed a menace to Washington and also a threat to U.S.-Japanese friendship. The U.S. State Department had suspected and looked hard for evidence that African Americans and Japanese immigrants were forming a racial (antiwhite) conspiracy to stage a revolt against Washington.6 In fact, as Tokyo-Washington diplomacy became estranged in the 1930s, Japanese propaganda called for a trans-Pacific racial alliance between Japanese and African Americans as an anti-American (antiwhite) gesture. Regardless, it is undeniable

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.