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Bacterial Cultures and Linguistic Colonies: Mori Rintaro's Experiments with History, Science, and Language

Bacterial Cultures and Linguistic Colonies: Mori Rintaro's Experiments with History, Science, and... mensurable differences and impossible divides. Born in 1862 in a small village on the Japan Sea, he followed in the footsteps of his father, a physician to the daimyo of Tsuwano, studying the Chinese classics as well as Dutch medicine. In 1872 the daimyo sent him to Tokyo, where he received further medical training. H e also studied German, which was quickly replacing Dutch as the language of medical research in Japan. Upon completing medical school in 1881,Mori joined the army with the rank of lieutenant and, in 1884, traveled to Germany to study military hygiene. There, he became interested in the emergent science of microbes and participated in the debates around Koch and Pettenkoffer, as well as in military maneuvers and diplomatic missions. H e also read widely in German literature and philosophy, taking to Goethe, Hartmann, Schopenhauer, and others and following the European debates on naturalism. In 1888, with the rank of captain, he returned to Tokyo to become a professor of physiology at the Army Medical School. In Tokyo, his education and experiences put him in a position to dominate scientific and literary circles. He took part in the debates on hygiene and nutrition in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Bacterial Cultures and Linguistic Colonies: Mori Rintaro's Experiments with History, Science, and Language

positions asia critique , Volume 6 (3) – Dec 1, 1998

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1998 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-6-3-597
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

mensurable differences and impossible divides. Born in 1862 in a small village on the Japan Sea, he followed in the footsteps of his father, a physician to the daimyo of Tsuwano, studying the Chinese classics as well as Dutch medicine. In 1872 the daimyo sent him to Tokyo, where he received further medical training. H e also studied German, which was quickly replacing Dutch as the language of medical research in Japan. Upon completing medical school in 1881,Mori joined the army with the rank of lieutenant and, in 1884, traveled to Germany to study military hygiene. There, he became interested in the emergent science of microbes and participated in the debates around Koch and Pettenkoffer, as well as in military maneuvers and diplomatic missions. H e also read widely in German literature and philosophy, taking to Goethe, Hartmann, Schopenhauer, and others and following the European debates on naturalism. In 1888, with the rank of captain, he returned to Tokyo to become a professor of physiology at the Army Medical School. In Tokyo, his education and experiences put him in a position to dominate scientific and literary circles. He took part in the debates on hygiene and nutrition in

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1998

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