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Associate Editor's Introduction

Associate Editor's Introduction R e v i e w s Mark C. Long In Professing and Pedagog y: Learning the Teaching of English, which we take up in this issue, Shari Stenberg insists on a definition of pedagogy that is more than the practice of teaching or the theory that informs it. “Pedagogy,” Stenberg writes, “is a knowledge-making activity that involves the interplay of visions and practices, both of which require reflection . . . is dependent on learners and is remade with every encounter, as the students and the teacher change . . . [and] cannot be finished; we cannot ‘finally’ learn to teach” (xviii). And yet, how many of us, pulled away from this process of remaking ourselves as teachers, fall back on the routine and repetition of classroom practices? How many of us rely on theories of teaching without working to refine and develop those theories as learning-oriented practitioners? Joining Pedagog y as the associate editor of the Reviews section has reaffirmed my conviction that pedagogy is a knowledge-making activity. The effort to improve teaching and the status of teaching can be successful only insofar as conceptions of the discipline of English studies and professional identity are reexamined — http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy Duke University Press

Associate Editor's Introduction

Pedagogy , Volume 6 (1) – Jan 1, 2006

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Copyright
© 2006 Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
DOI
10.1215/15314200-6-1-143
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

R e v i e w s Mark C. Long In Professing and Pedagog y: Learning the Teaching of English, which we take up in this issue, Shari Stenberg insists on a definition of pedagogy that is more than the practice of teaching or the theory that informs it. “Pedagogy,” Stenberg writes, “is a knowledge-making activity that involves the interplay of visions and practices, both of which require reflection . . . is dependent on learners and is remade with every encounter, as the students and the teacher change . . . [and] cannot be finished; we cannot ‘finally’ learn to teach” (xviii). And yet, how many of us, pulled away from this process of remaking ourselves as teachers, fall back on the routine and repetition of classroom practices? How many of us rely on theories of teaching without working to refine and develop those theories as learning-oriented practitioners? Joining Pedagog y as the associate editor of the Reviews section has reaffirmed my conviction that pedagogy is a knowledge-making activity. The effort to improve teaching and the status of teaching can be successful only insofar as conceptions of the discipline of English studies and professional identity are reexamined —

Journal

PedagogyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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