Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

ARE THERE TWO TONAL PRACTICES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC?

ARE THERE TWO TONAL PRACTICES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC? thus allows for shifting analytical perspectives—prerequisite for dealing with a highly differentiated and individualized body of music. The multitonal idea, moreover, has proved to be attractive to both theorists and historians (Bailey himself is a historian); and an especially appealing feature of the present volume is the inclusion of authors from both sides of what is normally a disciplinary and methodological divide. There is nevertheless an inherent danger in such concepts as “paired tonics,” “directional tonality,” “progressive tonality,” and “interlocking tonality.” Despite their necessarily informal status, they appear to offer something more fixed and theoretically substantial than is in fact the case. As a consequence, the same analysts who reject traditional views of tonal centricity as too rigid for nineteenth-century music are inclined to adopt multitonalism as if it were a well-defined analytical category based upon definite and stable methodological principles. Reifying the notion, they embrace it as an up-to-date analytical absolute to replace the old, distrusted concept of monotonality, conferring on it the status of a new theoretical ideal according to which any tonally ambiguous work can be interpreted and against which it can be measured. One distorting lens is substituted for another. One recognizes this danger http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

ARE THERE TWO TONAL PRACTICES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY MUSIC?

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 43 (1) – Jan 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/are-there-two-tonal-practices-in-nineteenth-century-music-ZWqELlxu2t
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-43-1-135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

thus allows for shifting analytical perspectives—prerequisite for dealing with a highly differentiated and individualized body of music. The multitonal idea, moreover, has proved to be attractive to both theorists and historians (Bailey himself is a historian); and an especially appealing feature of the present volume is the inclusion of authors from both sides of what is normally a disciplinary and methodological divide. There is nevertheless an inherent danger in such concepts as “paired tonics,” “directional tonality,” “progressive tonality,” and “interlocking tonality.” Despite their necessarily informal status, they appear to offer something more fixed and theoretically substantial than is in fact the case. As a consequence, the same analysts who reject traditional views of tonal centricity as too rigid for nineteenth-century music are inclined to adopt multitonalism as if it were a well-defined analytical category based upon definite and stable methodological principles. Reifying the notion, they embrace it as an up-to-date analytical absolute to replace the old, distrusted concept of monotonality, conferring on it the status of a new theoretical ideal according to which any tonally ambiguous work can be interpreted and against which it can be measured. One distorting lens is substituted for another. One recognizes this danger

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.