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Analytical and Cross-Cultural Studies in World Music

Analytical and Cross-Cultural Studies in World Music 57:2, Fall 2013 DOI 10.1215/00222909-2323524 © 2013 by Yale University 1. Periodicity, grouping structure, and directed change John Roeder's introduction says the analytical essays employ "a tightly controlled theoretical vocabulary" and "contribute to our understanding of universal aspects of musical production and cognition" (13, 15). The three main aspects Roeder identifies are periodicity, grouping structure, and directed change. At the book's conclusion, Michael Tenzer employs these notions as a basis for assigning twenty pieces (one from each of the analytical studies in the two anthologies) to ten temporal categories (419­39). Tenzer's account of periodicity results in the categories "open" (unmeasured, pulsed, and metered) and "closed" (cyclic and ostinato). In Tenzer's view, content is repeated in closed music but "need not be" in open music. These categories are further specified in terms of entrainment, prediction (including expectation and anticipation), and "the psychological present," notions advanced in recent studies of music cognition (e.g., London 2004), as well as such concepts as "simple proportions" and "sufficiently elementary ratios." The authors' idea of grouping structure depends on temporal segmentation and, like "paradigmatic" analyses by Nicolas Ruwet (1972) and JeanJacques Nattiez (1975), involves segments that are nested but not overlapping. Bases for inclusion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Analytical and Cross-Cultural Studies in World Music

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 57 (2) – Sep 21, 2013

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References (24)

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2323524
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

57:2, Fall 2013 DOI 10.1215/00222909-2323524 © 2013 by Yale University 1. Periodicity, grouping structure, and directed change John Roeder's introduction says the analytical essays employ "a tightly controlled theoretical vocabulary" and "contribute to our understanding of universal aspects of musical production and cognition" (13, 15). The three main aspects Roeder identifies are periodicity, grouping structure, and directed change. At the book's conclusion, Michael Tenzer employs these notions as a basis for assigning twenty pieces (one from each of the analytical studies in the two anthologies) to ten temporal categories (419­39). Tenzer's account of periodicity results in the categories "open" (unmeasured, pulsed, and metered) and "closed" (cyclic and ostinato). In Tenzer's view, content is repeated in closed music but "need not be" in open music. These categories are further specified in terms of entrainment, prediction (including expectation and anticipation), and "the psychological present," notions advanced in recent studies of music cognition (e.g., London 2004), as well as such concepts as "simple proportions" and "sufficiently elementary ratios." The authors' idea of grouping structure depends on temporal segmentation and, like "paradigmatic" analyses by Nicolas Ruwet (1972) and JeanJacques Nattiez (1975), involves segments that are nested but not overlapping. Bases for inclusion

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 21, 2013

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