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Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach

Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach ™ ing and neighboring motions. These lines are then harmonized with contrapuntal chords. The dominant is introduced as a structural chord, capable of serving as the goal of a progression, but still requiring resolution to tonic. “Intermediate” (pre-dominant) harmonies connect structural tonic to structural dominant: II, IV, VI and III. In the examples illustrating intermediate harmonies, the “crossed slur” is used, with no explanation. Structural tonic and dominant, with the intermediate harmonies connecting them, are identified as Stufen, “harmonic pillars” (p. 65) that support the musical structure. A detailed presentation of prolongation techniques follows; each concept is accompanied by musical examples taken from the classical literature. These concepts include the use of chord inversions to create bass arpeggiations, leaps in the bass in connection with bass arpeggiations, elaboration by means of neighboring and passing motion (and the possibility of accompanying contrapuntal chords), transformation of harmonies by chromatic changes (secondary dominants) or by contrapuntal motion (i.e., I5-6), and linear relationships with upper voices, such as gestures in parallel motion (10-10-10, 6-6-6) or voice exchange. Exercises in bass-line analysis follow. The first ones consist of harmonic analysis and the subsequent identification of Stufen, “the ‘main’ harmonies” (p. 73). The student http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 45 (2) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Yale University
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-45-2-483
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

™ ing and neighboring motions. These lines are then harmonized with contrapuntal chords. The dominant is introduced as a structural chord, capable of serving as the goal of a progression, but still requiring resolution to tonic. “Intermediate” (pre-dominant) harmonies connect structural tonic to structural dominant: II, IV, VI and III. In the examples illustrating intermediate harmonies, the “crossed slur” is used, with no explanation. Structural tonic and dominant, with the intermediate harmonies connecting them, are identified as Stufen, “harmonic pillars” (p. 65) that support the musical structure. A detailed presentation of prolongation techniques follows; each concept is accompanied by musical examples taken from the classical literature. These concepts include the use of chord inversions to create bass arpeggiations, leaps in the bass in connection with bass arpeggiations, elaboration by means of neighboring and passing motion (and the possibility of accompanying contrapuntal chords), transformation of harmonies by chromatic changes (secondary dominants) or by contrapuntal motion (i.e., I5-6), and linear relationships with upper voices, such as gestures in parallel motion (10-10-10, 6-6-6) or voice exchange. Exercises in bass-line analysis follow. The first ones consist of harmonic analysis and the subsequent identification of Stufen, “the ‘main’ harmonies” (p. 73). The student

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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