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Ain’t Gonna Study War No More (John 20:19–23)

Ain’t Gonna Study War No More (John 20:19–23) Ain't Gonna Study War No More (John 20:19-23) Jacqueline Grant We have the potential of becoming experts in what we study. Pre­ sumably, we study for proficiency and efficiency-to become better at one thing or another, to make a better world. Certainly, studying produces better professionals-preachers, teachers, engineers, law­ yers, doctors, scientists. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that studying leads us toward progress. It indicates that we ought to be careful of what we select to study, for proficiency may indeed follow. Progress is sometimes ambiguous. For isn't it progress that has gotten us in this high-tech war? Computer technology has enabled us to carry on a war in the air for several days without making use of ground force. Scud missiles are intercepted by Patriot missiles -disintegration in midair. Indeed, our studying war has made us good at engaging in war. Warfare has taken on such sophisticated methodologies, making use of phenomenal technology. We have stud­ ied war well. We've moved through traditional, biological, and chemi­ cal to high-tech warfare. Precision is such that we can target build­ ings and military equipment in the midst of heavily populated areas with minimal human casualties. For some time now, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Ain’t Gonna Study War No More (John 20:19–23)

Black Sacred Music , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 1993

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Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-7.1.62
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ain't Gonna Study War No More (John 20:19-23) Jacqueline Grant We have the potential of becoming experts in what we study. Pre­ sumably, we study for proficiency and efficiency-to become better at one thing or another, to make a better world. Certainly, studying produces better professionals-preachers, teachers, engineers, law­ yers, doctors, scientists. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that studying leads us toward progress. It indicates that we ought to be careful of what we select to study, for proficiency may indeed follow. Progress is sometimes ambiguous. For isn't it progress that has gotten us in this high-tech war? Computer technology has enabled us to carry on a war in the air for several days without making use of ground force. Scud missiles are intercepted by Patriot missiles -disintegration in midair. Indeed, our studying war has made us good at engaging in war. Warfare has taken on such sophisticated methodologies, making use of phenomenal technology. We have stud­ ied war well. We've moved through traditional, biological, and chemi­ cal to high-tech warfare. Precision is such that we can target build­ ings and military equipment in the midst of heavily populated areas with minimal human casualties. For some time now,

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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