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Ah Neng's Critique

Ah Neng's Critique I am blind and indigenous to Taiwan. I had only nine years of national education. I am not a scholar. Nor am I a politician, and I have never been a government official. Many people would consequently say that I am not qualified to discuss the problems that Understanding Taiwan: The Society presents. Nonetheless I heard some media criticism of this textbook that positions 8:1 © 2000 by Duke University Press positions 8:1 Spring 2000 parliamentary (legislative Yuan) members had made a couple of days ago. It brought back with vivid clarity the nightmare damage of those outrightly distorted stories, such as “Wu Fung,” that I had heard when I was a little boy. The new edition of Understanding Taiwan contains, I heard very clearly, the word fang, or barbarian. So I started paying attention to related reports in the media. I listened very carefully to the entire debate among three politicians, members of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and the New Party. When the DPP people, who are supposedly the ones who understand Taiwan, did not give direct responses to the questions that Yin Chang-yi raised about indigenous peoples, I got the impression that hot exchanges over http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-8-1-179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I am blind and indigenous to Taiwan. I had only nine years of national education. I am not a scholar. Nor am I a politician, and I have never been a government official. Many people would consequently say that I am not qualified to discuss the problems that Understanding Taiwan: The Society presents. Nonetheless I heard some media criticism of this textbook that positions 8:1 © 2000 by Duke University Press positions 8:1 Spring 2000 parliamentary (legislative Yuan) members had made a couple of days ago. It brought back with vivid clarity the nightmare damage of those outrightly distorted stories, such as “Wu Fung,” that I had heard when I was a little boy. The new edition of Understanding Taiwan contains, I heard very clearly, the word fang, or barbarian. So I started paying attention to related reports in the media. I listened very carefully to the entire debate among three politicians, members of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and the New Party. When the DPP people, who are supposedly the ones who understand Taiwan, did not give direct responses to the questions that Yin Chang-yi raised about indigenous peoples, I got the impression that hot exchanges over

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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