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AFTERWORD TO AN INTRODUCTION

AFTERWORD TO AN INTRODUCTION AFTERWORD TO AN INTRODUCTION The authentic introduction to this symposium—to both of its installments— comprises the first contributions to part one: Ulrich Beck’s article, “The Truth of Others,” and Bruno Latour’s reply, “Whose Cosmos, Which Cosmopolitics?”1 Accordingly, “Preface to an Introduction” was the title I gave to my remarks last time. For the same reason, I am calling this installment’s offering (though it introduces a new set and a distinct kind of articles) an afterword. Inadequate attention to religion was the basis of Latour’s critique of Beck, religious particularism being the most pressing case to which Beck’s “cosmopolitan realism” might be applied. In this second group of essays—which treats the commonalities and commensuration of Islam, Christianity, Judaism, and the modern faith in human rights—we are responding to Latour’s challenge. 1. Ulrich Beck, “The Truth of Others: A Cosmopolitan Approach,” Common Knowledge 10.3 (fall 2004): 430–49. Bruno Latour, “Whose Cosmos, Which Cosmopolitics? Comments on the Peace Terms of Ulrich Beck,” 450–62. Common Knowledge 11:1 Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press much of it French, the archbishop of Paris maintains: “philosophical reflection is no luxury.” Santiago Zabala, in responding to this rappel à l’ordre, points the irony. Hermeneuticists and postphilosophers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

AFTERWORD TO AN INTRODUCTION

Common Knowledge , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-11-1-18
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AFTERWORD TO AN INTRODUCTION The authentic introduction to this symposium—to both of its installments— comprises the first contributions to part one: Ulrich Beck’s article, “The Truth of Others,” and Bruno Latour’s reply, “Whose Cosmos, Which Cosmopolitics?”1 Accordingly, “Preface to an Introduction” was the title I gave to my remarks last time. For the same reason, I am calling this installment’s offering (though it introduces a new set and a distinct kind of articles) an afterword. Inadequate attention to religion was the basis of Latour’s critique of Beck, religious particularism being the most pressing case to which Beck’s “cosmopolitan realism” might be applied. In this second group of essays—which treats the commonalities and commensuration of Islam, Christianity, Judaism, and the modern faith in human rights—we are responding to Latour’s challenge. 1. Ulrich Beck, “The Truth of Others: A Cosmopolitan Approach,” Common Knowledge 10.3 (fall 2004): 430–49. Bruno Latour, “Whose Cosmos, Which Cosmopolitics? Comments on the Peace Terms of Ulrich Beck,” 450–62. Common Knowledge 11:1 Copyright 2005 by Duke University Press much of it French, the archbishop of Paris maintains: “philosophical reflection is no luxury.” Santiago Zabala, in responding to this rappel à l’ordre, points the irony. Hermeneuticists and postphilosophers

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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