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Aesthetics, Politics, and the Return of Negritude

Aesthetics, Politics, and the Return of Negritude Not so long ago, Negritude was an object of scepticism in many postcolonial quarters for its supposed implication in a variety of no-longer respectable patterns of thought: its purportedly essentialist approach to cultural identity seemed dated in relation to the more open-ended poetics of creolization, and its politics was seen as either too committed to Manichean patterns of anti-colonial thinking or too accommodating in its willingness to envision federalist as opposed to nationalist solutions to the problem of decolonization. Over the past decade that situation has changed dramatically, both in relation to Negritude politics (see the ground-breaking work of Gary Wilder) and in relation to its poetics. This review essay examines the recent (re)turn to Negritude by looking at Carrie Noland's 2015 Voices of Negritude in Modernist Print: Aesthetic Subjectivity, Diaspora, and the Lyric Regime , engaging with its revisionist, Adorno-based take on “the Negritude poem” (specifically the poetry of Aimé Césaire and Léon-Gontran Damas) and contextualizing her approach in relation to the recent “aesthetic turn” in post colonial studies. Aimé Césaire Léon-Gontran Damas Caribbean modernism postcolonial poetics francophone studies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Duke University Press

Aesthetics, Politics, and the Return of Negritude

Comparative Literature , Volume 69 (2) – Jun 1, 2017

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0010-4124
eISSN
1945-8517
DOI
10.1215/00104124-3865423
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Not so long ago, Negritude was an object of scepticism in many postcolonial quarters for its supposed implication in a variety of no-longer respectable patterns of thought: its purportedly essentialist approach to cultural identity seemed dated in relation to the more open-ended poetics of creolization, and its politics was seen as either too committed to Manichean patterns of anti-colonial thinking or too accommodating in its willingness to envision federalist as opposed to nationalist solutions to the problem of decolonization. Over the past decade that situation has changed dramatically, both in relation to Negritude politics (see the ground-breaking work of Gary Wilder) and in relation to its poetics. This review essay examines the recent (re)turn to Negritude by looking at Carrie Noland's 2015 Voices of Negritude in Modernist Print: Aesthetic Subjectivity, Diaspora, and the Lyric Regime , engaging with its revisionist, Adorno-based take on “the Negritude poem” (specifically the poetry of Aimé Césaire and Léon-Gontran Damas) and contextualizing her approach in relation to the recent “aesthetic turn” in post colonial studies. Aimé Césaire Léon-Gontran Damas Caribbean modernism postcolonial poetics francophone studies

Journal

Comparative LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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