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Absolute Color, Fluctuating Mischfarben, and Structurally Functional “Gypsy” Orchestration

Absolute Color, Fluctuating Mischfarben, and Structurally Functional “Gypsy” Orchestration Correlating particular instrumental colors with pitch chromaticism, three early twentieth-century scholars demonstrate how a methodical use of colorful winds, less colorful strings, and wind-string mixtures informed actual orchestrational practices. After demonstrating how Wagner’s use of instrumental “residue” creates an “articulate unity” in a passage from Lohengrin , Theodor Adorno describes how Alban Berg’s orchestration of the Frühen Lieder combines particular instrumental colors and generalized orchestral sonorities into articulate Mischfarben that distinguish whole-tone scales from functional harmony. After defining “absolute color” in the context of Gluck’s orchestration, Ernst Kurth demonstrates how “absolute” wind instrument colors delineate “absolute” “destructive” harmonic colors in Wagner’s Tristan instrumentation. Finally, Arnold Schoenberg’s functional orchestration of the “Rondo alla Zingarese” from Brahms’s G-minor Piano Quartet matches “indirectly related” harmonies with vivid wind and percussion colors and “closely related” harmonies with string-centered sonorities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Music Theory Duke University Press

Absolute Color, Fluctuating Mischfarben, and Structurally Functional “Gypsy” Orchestration

Journal of Music Theory , Volume 57 (2) – Sep 21, 2013

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References (19)

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
0022-2909
eISSN
1941-7497
DOI
10.1215/00222909-2323470
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Correlating particular instrumental colors with pitch chromaticism, three early twentieth-century scholars demonstrate how a methodical use of colorful winds, less colorful strings, and wind-string mixtures informed actual orchestrational practices. After demonstrating how Wagner’s use of instrumental “residue” creates an “articulate unity” in a passage from Lohengrin , Theodor Adorno describes how Alban Berg’s orchestration of the Frühen Lieder combines particular instrumental colors and generalized orchestral sonorities into articulate Mischfarben that distinguish whole-tone scales from functional harmony. After defining “absolute color” in the context of Gluck’s orchestration, Ernst Kurth demonstrates how “absolute” wind instrument colors delineate “absolute” “destructive” harmonic colors in Wagner’s Tristan instrumentation. Finally, Arnold Schoenberg’s functional orchestration of the “Rondo alla Zingarese” from Brahms’s G-minor Piano Quartet matches “indirectly related” harmonies with vivid wind and percussion colors and “closely related” harmonies with string-centered sonorities.

Journal

Journal of Music TheoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 21, 2013

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