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A Taste for Home: The Modern Middle Class in Ottoman Beirut

A Taste for Home: The Modern Middle Class in Ottoman Beirut REVIEW Toufoul Abou-Hodeib Stanford, CA: University of Stanford Press, 2017 260 pages. ISBN 9780804799799 Reviewed by ELLEN FLEISCHMANN Tofoul Abou-Hodeib’saim in A Taste for Home is to “write a cultural history of domesticity that is at once global in the widest sense of the term and local enough to enter the most private of spaces” (2). Focusing on mid- to late nineteenth-century Beirut, she argues for relocating concepts of “home” and middle-class domesticity from “the periphery of modernity” to the center of its meaning and production (33). The book examines Ottoman archival sources in Istanbul, minutes of the Beirut municipal council, Hanafi court records, British and French colonial archives, American University of Beirut Jafet Library archives, Arabic press accounts in Beirut and Cairo, memoirs, and images from trade catalogs, among other archival material. In A Taste for Home Abou-Hodeib takes what is both a category of analysis and a concept—domesticity—and asserts its centrality to “elucidat[ing] the history of Lebanon and the Levant during the later periods of the Mandate and independence” (175; my emphasis). This argument builds in an erudite and original way on the work of numerous scholars who have written about late nineteenth- to early twentieth-century press http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Middle East Women's Studies Duke University Press

A Taste for Home: The Modern Middle Class in Ottoman Beirut

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies
ISSN
1552-5864
eISSN
1558-9579
DOI
10.1215/15525864-7273762
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW Toufoul Abou-Hodeib Stanford, CA: University of Stanford Press, 2017 260 pages. ISBN 9780804799799 Reviewed by ELLEN FLEISCHMANN Tofoul Abou-Hodeib’saim in A Taste for Home is to “write a cultural history of domesticity that is at once global in the widest sense of the term and local enough to enter the most private of spaces” (2). Focusing on mid- to late nineteenth-century Beirut, she argues for relocating concepts of “home” and middle-class domesticity from “the periphery of modernity” to the center of its meaning and production (33). The book examines Ottoman archival sources in Istanbul, minutes of the Beirut municipal council, Hanafi court records, British and French colonial archives, American University of Beirut Jafet Library archives, Arabic press accounts in Beirut and Cairo, memoirs, and images from trade catalogs, among other archival material. In A Taste for Home Abou-Hodeib takes what is both a category of analysis and a concept—domesticity—and asserts its centrality to “elucidat[ing] the history of Lebanon and the Levant during the later periods of the Mandate and independence” (175; my emphasis). This argument builds in an erudite and original way on the work of numerous scholars who have written about late nineteenth- to early twentieth-century press

Journal

Journal of Middle East Women's StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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