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A History of Histories: Epics, Chronicles, Romances, and Inquiries from Herodotus and Thucydides to the Twentieth Century

A History of Histories: Epics, Chronicles, Romances, and Inquiries from Herodotus and Thucydides... 15:2 © 2009 by Duke University Press since there is no discussion of theologians. None is even named, aside from a throwaway reference to Aquinas and Henry of Ghent. Moreover, claims that these tales of heroism, virtue, or miracles cross boundaries or maintain cultural continuities are not based on an analysis of reception. A good deal of historical evidence is available that shows us how medieval audiences heard and medieval readers read, but it is not brought into play here. It is thus difficult for us to tell how Kleinberg thinks reading or hearing about St. George and the dragon in the thirteenth century is unlike — as well as like — reading and hearing about Harry Potter in the twentieth. Dissimilarity, however — both dissimilarity across time and dissimilarity within cultural communities — is crucial to understanding the construction and reception of narratives. When Kleinberg writes about the lives of Francis of Assisi and Brother Ginepro (Juniper), the holy fool, he is attentive to their differences from each other and hence to their different appeals, but too often by the end of his book all stories are reduced, by a rather general, functional analysis, to the same http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

A History of Histories: Epics, Chronicles, Romances, and Inquiries from Herodotus and Thucydides to the Twentieth Century

Common Knowledge , Volume 15 (2) – Apr 1, 2009

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-2008-051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

15:2 © 2009 by Duke University Press since there is no discussion of theologians. None is even named, aside from a throwaway reference to Aquinas and Henry of Ghent. Moreover, claims that these tales of heroism, virtue, or miracles cross boundaries or maintain cultural continuities are not based on an analysis of reception. A good deal of historical evidence is available that shows us how medieval audiences heard and medieval readers read, but it is not brought into play here. It is thus difficult for us to tell how Kleinberg thinks reading or hearing about St. George and the dragon in the thirteenth century is unlike — as well as like — reading and hearing about Harry Potter in the twentieth. Dissimilarity, however — both dissimilarity across time and dissimilarity within cultural communities — is crucial to understanding the construction and reception of narratives. When Kleinberg writes about the lives of Francis of Assisi and Brother Ginepro (Juniper), the holy fool, he is attentive to their differences from each other and hence to their different appeals, but too often by the end of his book all stories are reduced, by a rather general, functional analysis, to the same

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2009

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