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A Chronicle of Changing Clothes

A Chronicle of Changing Clothes © 2003 by Duke University Press they offer an amusing psychoanalysis of modern China.”1 Less than a year later, Chang translated, revised, and expanded the piece for publication in a Chinese-language journal, Gujin [Past and present], retitling it “Gengyi ji” [A chronicle of changing clothes].2 While much of the material remained the same, this retooling of the essay involved a subtle reconfiguration of Chang’s authorial voice and self-positioning vis-à -vis her Chinese readers, who are addressed less as psychiatric subjects than as collaborators in a troubled cultural history that extends through the largely unspoken (but ever present) privations of life during wartime. It was this version of the article that was ultimately included in Chang’s 1945 collection of essays and cultural criticism, Liuyan [Written on water].3 The text presented here, along with original illustrations by Chang herself, is a triangulated translation into English of Chang’s translation into Chinese, which attempts to mediate Chang’s successive mediations between different languages, audiences, genders, and positions. What emerges from these textual complexities is a layered and finely grained articulation of the relation between history (intellectual, social, and political) and fashion in modern China. This is materialist history that takes a palpable delight http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

A Chronicle of Changing Clothes

positions asia critique , Volume 11 (2) – Sep 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-11-2-427
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© 2003 by Duke University Press they offer an amusing psychoanalysis of modern China.”1 Less than a year later, Chang translated, revised, and expanded the piece for publication in a Chinese-language journal, Gujin [Past and present], retitling it “Gengyi ji” [A chronicle of changing clothes].2 While much of the material remained the same, this retooling of the essay involved a subtle reconfiguration of Chang’s authorial voice and self-positioning vis-à -vis her Chinese readers, who are addressed less as psychiatric subjects than as collaborators in a troubled cultural history that extends through the largely unspoken (but ever present) privations of life during wartime. It was this version of the article that was ultimately included in Chang’s 1945 collection of essays and cultural criticism, Liuyan [Written on water].3 The text presented here, along with original illustrations by Chang herself, is a triangulated translation into English of Chang’s translation into Chinese, which attempts to mediate Chang’s successive mediations between different languages, audiences, genders, and positions. What emerges from these textual complexities is a layered and finely grained articulation of the relation between history (intellectual, social, and political) and fashion in modern China. This is materialist history that takes a palpable delight

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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