Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

125th Street Rap Session

125th Street Rap Session C. Eric Lincoln Listen to me Brothers, I'm gonna tell it like it is, Why you don't get your percentage while The Man is gettin' his. Now it ain't no great big secret, and it ain't no mystery, You peed on the pumpkin, Brothers, when you forgot your history. Well, rap on, Brother! I got to lay it on the wood. Rap right on, Brother! Listen to me . Listen good. 'Cause you don't have to scratch An' you don't have to grin. Scratchin' without itchin' Is a vee-nial sin! Now you read in the Bible about the First Creation. Well it don't even mention this here civilization But they dug up the world to find the Very First Man, An' Brothers, lo and behold, he was a black African! Well, rap on, Brother! He was in Tanganyiki. Rap right on, Brother! He had on a Dashiki! The poem, J25th Street Rap Session," written in 1967 by C. Eric Lincoln, distin guished African American professor of religion at Duke University, demonstrates that the influence patterns between rappers and scholars is by no means a one way street . Reprinted with permission from C. Eric Lincoln, Thi s Road since http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Black Sacred Music Duke University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/125th-street-rap-session-YE4TNc8Aro
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1043-9455
eISSN
2640-9879
DOI
10.1215/10439455-5.1.80
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

C. Eric Lincoln Listen to me Brothers, I'm gonna tell it like it is, Why you don't get your percentage while The Man is gettin' his. Now it ain't no great big secret, and it ain't no mystery, You peed on the pumpkin, Brothers, when you forgot your history. Well, rap on, Brother! I got to lay it on the wood. Rap right on, Brother! Listen to me . Listen good. 'Cause you don't have to scratch An' you don't have to grin. Scratchin' without itchin' Is a vee-nial sin! Now you read in the Bible about the First Creation. Well it don't even mention this here civilization But they dug up the world to find the Very First Man, An' Brothers, lo and behold, he was a black African! Well, rap on, Brother! He was in Tanganyiki. Rap right on, Brother! He had on a Dashiki! The poem, J25th Street Rap Session," written in 1967 by C. Eric Lincoln, distin guished African American professor of religion at Duke University, demonstrates that the influence patterns between rappers and scholars is by no means a one way street . Reprinted with permission from C. Eric Lincoln, Thi s Road since

Journal

Black Sacred MusicDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.