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Where did the Mirror Go? The Text of Plato [?] Alcibiades I 133c1-6

Where did the Mirror Go? The Text of Plato [?] Alcibiades I 133c1-6 AbstractAt Alcibiades I, 133b-c, the reader expects, but does not according to the MSS find, the return of the mirror-motif that had supposedly explained the true meaning of the Delphic injunction. Hence it remains unclear why anything viewed within the soul should act in any way that resembles a mirror. I argue that the substitution of a single letter in one word, about which the manuscripts and modern scholars in any case disagree, can restore the necessary reference to a reflective surface, though not specifically to a mirror, since the term for a mirror could only be applied to sight. A failure to understand the underlying intertextual allusion to Cratylus 408c had resulted in a safe but unsatisfactory substitution by Late Antiquity, and other modifications followed thereafter in an effort to give meaning to the text. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Elenchos de Gruyter

Where did the Mirror Go? The Text of Plato [?] Alcibiades I 133c1-6

Elenchos , Volume 36 (2): 12 – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston
ISSN
0392-7342
eISSN
2037-7177
DOI
10.1515/elen-2015-360208
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAt Alcibiades I, 133b-c, the reader expects, but does not according to the MSS find, the return of the mirror-motif that had supposedly explained the true meaning of the Delphic injunction. Hence it remains unclear why anything viewed within the soul should act in any way that resembles a mirror. I argue that the substitution of a single letter in one word, about which the manuscripts and modern scholars in any case disagree, can restore the necessary reference to a reflective surface, though not specifically to a mirror, since the term for a mirror could only be applied to sight. A failure to understand the underlying intertextual allusion to Cratylus 408c had resulted in a safe but unsatisfactory substitution by Late Antiquity, and other modifications followed thereafter in an effort to give meaning to the text.

Journal

Elenchosde Gruyter

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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