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Turkeys Do Not Vote for Christmas. The Brazilian Anti-Vote-Buying Law

Turkeys Do Not Vote for Christmas. The Brazilian Anti-Vote-Buying Law AbstractThe research to date shows conflicting results about the effect of perceived corruption on political participation by the public. Corruption perception can mobilize, demobilize, or show no impact on political participation. The Brazilian Anti-Vote-Buying Law of 1999, one of the fastest laws ever to be approved in the country, is an example of how perceived corruption can increase public engagement. Using process tracing, the author tells this story identifying two sets of factors ranked according to their causal power (distal and proximal conditions) and further test the theory. The Brazilian population, who perceived corruption as high, learned about the antidemocratic aspects of vote buying and how to curb it. This ‘informed’ perception of corruption led people to politically participate by signing the popular initiative. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Südosteuropa de Gruyter

Turkeys Do Not Vote for Christmas. The Brazilian Anti-Vote-Buying Law

Südosteuropa , Volume 66 (3): 24 – Sep 25, 2018

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
0722-480X
eISSN
2364-933X
DOI
10.1515/soeu-2018-0027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe research to date shows conflicting results about the effect of perceived corruption on political participation by the public. Corruption perception can mobilize, demobilize, or show no impact on political participation. The Brazilian Anti-Vote-Buying Law of 1999, one of the fastest laws ever to be approved in the country, is an example of how perceived corruption can increase public engagement. Using process tracing, the author tells this story identifying two sets of factors ranked according to their causal power (distal and proximal conditions) and further test the theory. The Brazilian population, who perceived corruption as high, learned about the antidemocratic aspects of vote buying and how to curb it. This ‘informed’ perception of corruption led people to politically participate by signing the popular initiative.

Journal

Südosteuropade Gruyter

Published: Sep 25, 2018

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