Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Role of Repentance—or Lack of It—in Zen Monasticism

The Role of Repentance—or Lack of It—in Zen Monasticism The Role of Repentance—or Lack of It— in Zen Monasticism Steven Heine Mysticism and Morality I will begin with some general comments about mysticism and morality before moving on to a specific case study involving Zen Buddhism. The premise of this conference is to celebrate and reflect on the centennial anniversary of the William James’ assertion that mysticism is not an abstract ideal realm of pure consciousness unaffected by the vicissitudes of time, but a matter of lived experience. The intention of the conference is to interpret the ethical implications and moral accountability of mystical traditions, which must take responsibility, for better or worse, for the impact of their teachings and practices on the social world. Interestingly enough it was Henry James, Sr. who provided the classic rationale for detachment from ethical concerns. Of James it was said that “As a Platonist and follower of Swedenborgian doctrine, he believed that there are two realms: a visible and an invisible, named Divine Love, the real one.” According to Louis Menand, “James therefore claimed to have no use for morality, a concept he regarded as bound up with the pernicious belief that people are responsible for the good or evil of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Religionsgeschichte de Gruyter

The Role of Repentance—or Lack of It—in Zen Monasticism

Archiv für Religionsgeschichte , Volume 9 (1): 20 – Dec 18, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/the-role-of-repentance-or-lack-of-it-in-zen-monasticism-0xjNkYsBTT
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2012 by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co.
ISSN
1868-8888
eISSN
1868-8888
DOI
10.1515/9783110198737.1.171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Role of Repentance—or Lack of It— in Zen Monasticism Steven Heine Mysticism and Morality I will begin with some general comments about mysticism and morality before moving on to a specific case study involving Zen Buddhism. The premise of this conference is to celebrate and reflect on the centennial anniversary of the William James’ assertion that mysticism is not an abstract ideal realm of pure consciousness unaffected by the vicissitudes of time, but a matter of lived experience. The intention of the conference is to interpret the ethical implications and moral accountability of mystical traditions, which must take responsibility, for better or worse, for the impact of their teachings and practices on the social world. Interestingly enough it was Henry James, Sr. who provided the classic rationale for detachment from ethical concerns. Of James it was said that “As a Platonist and follower of Swedenborgian doctrine, he believed that there are two realms: a visible and an invisible, named Divine Love, the real one.” According to Louis Menand, “James therefore claimed to have no use for morality, a concept he regarded as bound up with the pernicious belief that people are responsible for the good or evil of

Journal

Archiv für Religionsgeschichtede Gruyter

Published: Dec 18, 2007

There are no references for this article.