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The Pilgrimage to Liberty

The Pilgrimage to Liberty Leonard P. Liggio0 After reading The Road to Serfdom several times, I see the work as much more than the popular book of F. A. Hayek. I have found it to contain a number of themes and references which find depth and expanse in his other works. Hayek saw that National Socialism, Fascism and Marxism each condemned Classical Liberalism as its most hated doctrine. Hayek attributed the origins of The Road to Serfdom to "my annoyance with the complete misinterpretation in English "progressive" circles of the character of the Nazi movement (Preface 1976 (p. xxi))." Hayek wrote a memorandum to Sir William Beveridge, director of the London School of Economics, where Hayek was Economics Professor, which he expanded into an article in Contemporary Review (1938). He enlarged the article at the request of Professor Harry Gideonese's (University of Chicago and later president of Brooklyn College) for his Public Policy Pamphlets. The Road to Serfdom was one of a number of works that Hayek produced in the 1940s. He presented papers at Cambridge University, and "Individualism: True and False" (University College, Dublin) which Hayek felt introduced his unfulfilled study of individualist philosophy of the eighteenth century. War-time Cambridge University http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1999-0409
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Leonard P. Liggio0 After reading The Road to Serfdom several times, I see the work as much more than the popular book of F. A. Hayek. I have found it to contain a number of themes and references which find depth and expanse in his other works. Hayek saw that National Socialism, Fascism and Marxism each condemned Classical Liberalism as its most hated doctrine. Hayek attributed the origins of The Road to Serfdom to "my annoyance with the complete misinterpretation in English "progressive" circles of the character of the Nazi movement (Preface 1976 (p. xxi))." Hayek wrote a memorandum to Sir William Beveridge, director of the London School of Economics, where Hayek was Economics Professor, which he expanded into an article in Contemporary Review (1938). He enlarged the article at the request of Professor Harry Gideonese's (University of Chicago and later president of Brooklyn College) for his Public Policy Pamphlets. The Road to Serfdom was one of a number of works that Hayek produced in the 1940s. He presented papers at Cambridge University, and "Individualism: True and False" (University College, Dublin) which Hayek felt introduced his unfulfilled study of individualist philosophy of the eighteenth century. War-time Cambridge University

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References