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The Most Frequent Neurological Complications in HIV Patients in Constanta and the Influence that Coinfections Have in the Onset of Such Conditions

The Most Frequent Neurological Complications in HIV Patients in Constanta and the Influence that... AbstractAbstract: This paper shows the results of a retrospective observational analytical study that has enrolled 166 HIV positive patients diagnosed with a neurological complication between June 2012 and June 2020, in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital of Constanta. 119 patients (71,69%) were diagnosed with one of the three neurological complications: HIV associated dementia (HAD), Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) and CNS Toxoplasmosis (CT). We have noted CD4 levels, viral loads, and the presence/absence of other infections like: HBV, HCV, Treponema pallidum, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.The results show that PML and CT, in this order, are the main opportunistic infections with important neurological impact. Both, PML and CT are in direct correlation with the immune status, but also with other infections like the infection with HCV or with M. Tuberculosis. CD4 nadir <100 cells/mmc and viral load ≥100000copies/ml have a stronger association with PML (p<0,05). Patients known with HIV and T. pallidum infection are more likely, in case of new sudden neurological signs, to be diagnosed with Neurotoxoplasmosis versus PML, or HAD (p<0,05). Given the fact that HIV patients can have multiple alterations of neurological functions, and spectaculous but complicated neuro imagistic results, knowing the history of the patients, the lab results, and the statistical probability can help the physician, infectious disease specialist or neurologist, to make a faster and precise diagnosis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ARS Medica Tomitana de Gruyter

The Most Frequent Neurological Complications in HIV Patients in Constanta and the Influence that Coinfections Have in the Onset of Such Conditions

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 Pascu Corina et al., published by Sciendo
ISSN
1841-4036
eISSN
1841-4036
DOI
10.2478/arsm-2020-0027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAbstract: This paper shows the results of a retrospective observational analytical study that has enrolled 166 HIV positive patients diagnosed with a neurological complication between June 2012 and June 2020, in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital of Constanta. 119 patients (71,69%) were diagnosed with one of the three neurological complications: HIV associated dementia (HAD), Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) and CNS Toxoplasmosis (CT). We have noted CD4 levels, viral loads, and the presence/absence of other infections like: HBV, HCV, Treponema pallidum, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis.The results show that PML and CT, in this order, are the main opportunistic infections with important neurological impact. Both, PML and CT are in direct correlation with the immune status, but also with other infections like the infection with HCV or with M. Tuberculosis. CD4 nadir <100 cells/mmc and viral load ≥100000copies/ml have a stronger association with PML (p<0,05). Patients known with HIV and T. pallidum infection are more likely, in case of new sudden neurological signs, to be diagnosed with Neurotoxoplasmosis versus PML, or HAD (p<0,05). Given the fact that HIV patients can have multiple alterations of neurological functions, and spectaculous but complicated neuro imagistic results, knowing the history of the patients, the lab results, and the statistical probability can help the physician, infectious disease specialist or neurologist, to make a faster and precise diagnosis.

Journal

ARS Medica Tomitanade Gruyter

Published: Aug 1, 2020

Keywords: HIV; Coinfections; HIV associated dementia; Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy; CNS Toxoplasmosis

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