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The Marian Persecution and Early Elizabethan Protestants: Persecutors, Apostates, and the Wages of Sin

The Marian Persecution and Early Elizabethan Protestants: Persecutors, Apostates, and the Wages... The Marian Persecution and Early Elizabethan Protestants: Persecutors, Apostates, and the Wages of Sin* By Karl Gunther I. WhenJohnHalesreceivedthenewsofMaryTudor’sdeathin1558,hewrotean oration to England’s new queen, “vertuous Elizabeth.” A fervent Protestant in his mid-forties, Hales had enjoyed a lucrative legal career during the preceding two decades. His service to Thomas Cromwell in the 1530s had been rewarded with significant monastic spoils and during the early years of Edward VI’s reign he had served as clerk of the hanaper, a justice of the peace, a member of parlia- ment,andoneofProtectorSomerset’senclosurecommissioners. Afterthefallof his patron Somerset, however, Hales left England for Germany in 1551 and would remain there after Mary’s accession in 1553, joining the English Protes- tant exile congregation that formed at Frankfurt. Elizabeth’s accession five years later meant that Hales could return to his offices and lands in England and his message to the new queen began with an impassioned denunciation of the “tyr- annie” that had marked her half-sister’s reign. During the preceding five years, Maryand“theseunnaturallEnglishtormentours,Tyrantes,andfalseChristians” had not only aspired to be “Lordes of the goodes, possessions, and bodyes of theyr brethren and Countrey men,” but had taken aim at their souls by forcing everyman,woman,andchildtodenyChristopenlyandworshipidols. Notone for understatement, Hales described Mary’s reign http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

The Marian Persecution and Early Elizabethan Protestants: Persecutors, Apostates, and the Wages of Sin

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 by Gütersloher Verlagshaus
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2016-1070107
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Marian Persecution and Early Elizabethan Protestants: Persecutors, Apostates, and the Wages of Sin* By Karl Gunther I. WhenJohnHalesreceivedthenewsofMaryTudor’sdeathin1558,hewrotean oration to England’s new queen, “vertuous Elizabeth.” A fervent Protestant in his mid-forties, Hales had enjoyed a lucrative legal career during the preceding two decades. His service to Thomas Cromwell in the 1530s had been rewarded with significant monastic spoils and during the early years of Edward VI’s reign he had served as clerk of the hanaper, a justice of the peace, a member of parlia- ment,andoneofProtectorSomerset’senclosurecommissioners. Afterthefallof his patron Somerset, however, Hales left England for Germany in 1551 and would remain there after Mary’s accession in 1553, joining the English Protes- tant exile congregation that formed at Frankfurt. Elizabeth’s accession five years later meant that Hales could return to his offices and lands in England and his message to the new queen began with an impassioned denunciation of the “tyr- annie” that had marked her half-sister’s reign. During the preceding five years, Maryand“theseunnaturallEnglishtormentours,Tyrantes,andfalseChristians” had not only aspired to be “Lordes of the goodes, possessions, and bodyes of theyr brethren and Countrey men,” but had taken aim at their souls by forcing everyman,woman,andchildtodenyChristopenlyandworshipidols. Notone for understatement, Hales described Mary’s reign

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2016

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