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The impact of treated wastewater and biosolids from the municipal wastewater treatment plant on water and carbon dioxide effluxes from soils

The impact of treated wastewater and biosolids from the municipal wastewater treatment plant on... AbstractThe goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of products from a municipal wastewater treatment plant on the H2O and CO2 effluxes from two soils. The net H2O and CO2 effluxes were measured at the surface of nine beds with two different soils (Cambisol and Arenosol) and two crops (maize or vegetables). Soils in some beds were amended with stabilized sewage sludge (bed with Cambisol and maize) or composted sewage sludge (two beds with Cambisol and both crops) or were irrigated with treated wastewater (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). Remaining beds were irrigated with tap water (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). While stabilized and composted sewage sludge positively affected the CO2 emission, the effect of treated wastewater was not confirmed. Different treatments had negligible effect on the water efflux, which was mainly affected by the plant canopy that influence the temperature of the soil surface. Statistical analyses showed that trends of the CO2 efflux with respect to various scenarios measured on different days changed during the season. No significant correlations were found between the average H2O and CO2 effluxes and measured soil properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics de Gruyter

The impact of treated wastewater and biosolids from the municipal wastewater treatment plant on water and carbon dioxide effluxes from soils

The impact of treated wastewater and biosolids from the municipal wastewater treatment plant on water and carbon dioxide effluxes from soils

Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics , Volume 70 (3): 8 – Sep 1, 2022

Abstract

AbstractThe goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of products from a municipal wastewater treatment plant on the H2O and CO2 effluxes from two soils. The net H2O and CO2 effluxes were measured at the surface of nine beds with two different soils (Cambisol and Arenosol) and two crops (maize or vegetables). Soils in some beds were amended with stabilized sewage sludge (bed with Cambisol and maize) or composted sewage sludge (two beds with Cambisol and both crops) or were irrigated with treated wastewater (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). Remaining beds were irrigated with tap water (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). While stabilized and composted sewage sludge positively affected the CO2 emission, the effect of treated wastewater was not confirmed. Different treatments had negligible effect on the water efflux, which was mainly affected by the plant canopy that influence the temperature of the soil surface. Statistical analyses showed that trends of the CO2 efflux with respect to various scenarios measured on different days changed during the season. No significant correlations were found between the average H2O and CO2 effluxes and measured soil properties.

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2022 Miroslav Fér et al., published by Sciendo
ISSN
0042-790X
eISSN
1338-4333
DOI
10.2478/johh-2022-0022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of products from a municipal wastewater treatment plant on the H2O and CO2 effluxes from two soils. The net H2O and CO2 effluxes were measured at the surface of nine beds with two different soils (Cambisol and Arenosol) and two crops (maize or vegetables). Soils in some beds were amended with stabilized sewage sludge (bed with Cambisol and maize) or composted sewage sludge (two beds with Cambisol and both crops) or were irrigated with treated wastewater (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). Remaining beds were irrigated with tap water (two beds with Cambisol and both crops, and one bed with Arenosol and vegetable). While stabilized and composted sewage sludge positively affected the CO2 emission, the effect of treated wastewater was not confirmed. Different treatments had negligible effect on the water efflux, which was mainly affected by the plant canopy that influence the temperature of the soil surface. Statistical analyses showed that trends of the CO2 efflux with respect to various scenarios measured on different days changed during the season. No significant correlations were found between the average H2O and CO2 effluxes and measured soil properties.

Journal

Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanicsde Gruyter

Published: Sep 1, 2022

Keywords: Soil respiration; Sewage sludge; Composted sewage sludge; Irrigation; Soil properties

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