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The European Economic Community : Lessons from America

The European Economic Community : Lessons from America Communications et Commentaires Symposium sur le Cadre Institutionnel de l'Europe de 1993 Peter H. Aranson * Most of the democracies of Western Europe have embarked on a course that seeks by 1992 to unite their separate economies into a common market. Europeans who concentrate on the unquestioned virtues of free trade welcome this development, because it seeks to remove barriers to the free flow of goods, labor, and capital among member states. But Europeans who reflect on the equally unquestioned virtues of limited and decentralized governments view the European Community's increasingly powerful political and bureaucratic infrastructure as a threat to their individual national sovereignties and to the distinctive cultures, political traditions, and liberties within each nation. Beyond the European democracies, principally in the United States and among the Pacific rim nations, most commentators view this course as at best a challenge to open world markets and at worst the beginning of excessively polarized and restricted world trade. ° An earlier version of this paper was prepared for delivery at the 1989 sessions of P"Université d'Eté de la Nouvelle Economie", Université d'Aix-Marseille III, August 1989. Because of a family emergency, I was not able to present the paper myself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

The European Economic Community : Lessons from America

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1990-0405
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Communications et Commentaires Symposium sur le Cadre Institutionnel de l'Europe de 1993 Peter H. Aranson * Most of the democracies of Western Europe have embarked on a course that seeks by 1992 to unite their separate economies into a common market. Europeans who concentrate on the unquestioned virtues of free trade welcome this development, because it seeks to remove barriers to the free flow of goods, labor, and capital among member states. But Europeans who reflect on the equally unquestioned virtues of limited and decentralized governments view the European Community's increasingly powerful political and bureaucratic infrastructure as a threat to their individual national sovereignties and to the distinctive cultures, political traditions, and liberties within each nation. Beyond the European democracies, principally in the United States and among the Pacific rim nations, most commentators view this course as at best a challenge to open world markets and at worst the beginning of excessively polarized and restricted world trade. ° An earlier version of this paper was prepared for delivery at the 1989 sessions of P"Université d'Eté de la Nouvelle Economie", Université d'Aix-Marseille III, August 1989. Because of a family emergency, I was not able to present the paper myself.

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 1990

References