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The Comparison of Sensory Quality and Processing Potential of ‘Topaz’ Apples Grown in Organic Orchards and Orchards Managed in Integrated Production System

The Comparison of Sensory Quality and Processing Potential of ‘Topaz’ Apples Grown in Organic... AbstractThe aim of the study was to compare the sensory quality of scab resistant ‘Topaz’ apples grown in certified organic orchards (ECO) with those grown in orchards managed within integrated method (IP), and to determine their potential processing suitability. Fruits were harvested in five certificated IP and ECO orchards at the optimum ripeness stage and stored for two months in normal atmosphere at 1 ºC. Apple quality was assessed one day after cold storage and after 7 days of storage at the temperature 18 ºC to simulate shelf life. The results of taste and flavour sensory assessment did not explicitly demonstrate the effect of the orchard management system on the overall eating quality. Although the fruits from the organic orchards were perceived as less sweet and sourer, the management system did not influence the overall eating quality. There was no effect of the growing technology on quality traits connected with aroma and overall texture assessment. Regarding appearance evaluation, fruits from organic orchards were characterized by a higher variation in shape and size, and more frequently than in the case of IP apples had blemishes, scars and rust, which negatively affected their attractiveness. Analysis of the chemical composition of fruits indicates that apples from organic orchards are characterized on average by higher titratable acidity and higher soluble solids content than apples from IP orchards, which could favour their potential application as the additive regulating acidity and shaping the desirable sensory traits of processed organic products. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Horticultural Research de Gruyter

The Comparison of Sensory Quality and Processing Potential of ‘Topaz’ Apples Grown in Organic Orchards and Orchards Managed in Integrated Production System

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © by Walter de Gruyter GmbH
eISSN
2300-5009
DOI
10.2478/v10290-012-0015-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe aim of the study was to compare the sensory quality of scab resistant ‘Topaz’ apples grown in certified organic orchards (ECO) with those grown in orchards managed within integrated method (IP), and to determine their potential processing suitability. Fruits were harvested in five certificated IP and ECO orchards at the optimum ripeness stage and stored for two months in normal atmosphere at 1 ºC. Apple quality was assessed one day after cold storage and after 7 days of storage at the temperature 18 ºC to simulate shelf life. The results of taste and flavour sensory assessment did not explicitly demonstrate the effect of the orchard management system on the overall eating quality. Although the fruits from the organic orchards were perceived as less sweet and sourer, the management system did not influence the overall eating quality. There was no effect of the growing technology on quality traits connected with aroma and overall texture assessment. Regarding appearance evaluation, fruits from organic orchards were characterized by a higher variation in shape and size, and more frequently than in the case of IP apples had blemishes, scars and rust, which negatively affected their attractiveness. Analysis of the chemical composition of fruits indicates that apples from organic orchards are characterized on average by higher titratable acidity and higher soluble solids content than apples from IP orchards, which could favour their potential application as the additive regulating acidity and shaping the desirable sensory traits of processed organic products.

Journal

Journal of Horticultural Researchde Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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