Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Such defiant, obstinate disobedience”: Martin Luther’s Jonah and Michael Helding’s Recatholization Effort in Merseburg

“Such defiant, obstinate disobedience”: Martin Luther’s Jonah and Michael Helding’s... By Austra Reinis It was November 30th, 1550. Emperor Charles V had recently conferred the imperial regalia (Reichsregalien) on Michael Helding (1506­1561) and had entrusted him with the task of re-catholicizing the sovereign bishopric (Fürstbistum) of Merseburg, an enclave within Saxony. Helding, on his way to assume his new duties, was met in Lützen by envoys of the bishopric (Hochstift). They informed him they would require him to abstain from introducing religious changes in their churches. 1 Given such resistance, how would Helding approach his task? How would he seek to persuade his already largely Lutheran subjects to return to the Catholic faith? The most powerful means of persuasion available to sixteenth-century clergy, whether Lutheran or Catholic, was the sermon; with it they could expect to reach a wide spectrum of society on a regular basis. It was first and foremost through the preaching of Martin Luther and his followers that by the time of Luther's death in 1546, religious change had been initiated in large parts of Germany and beyond. In response to the challenge of the reformers, the first session of the Council of Trent in 1546 had decreed that "preaching is the chief duty of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

“Such defiant, obstinate disobedience”: Martin Luther’s Jonah and Michael Helding’s Recatholization Effort in Merseburg

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/such-defiant-obstinate-disobedience-martin-luther-s-jonah-and-michael-EiOxLUJPyF
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2198-0489
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2015-0107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By Austra Reinis It was November 30th, 1550. Emperor Charles V had recently conferred the imperial regalia (Reichsregalien) on Michael Helding (1506­1561) and had entrusted him with the task of re-catholicizing the sovereign bishopric (Fürstbistum) of Merseburg, an enclave within Saxony. Helding, on his way to assume his new duties, was met in Lützen by envoys of the bishopric (Hochstift). They informed him they would require him to abstain from introducing religious changes in their churches. 1 Given such resistance, how would Helding approach his task? How would he seek to persuade his already largely Lutheran subjects to return to the Catholic faith? The most powerful means of persuasion available to sixteenth-century clergy, whether Lutheran or Catholic, was the sermon; with it they could expect to reach a wide spectrum of society on a regular basis. It was first and foremost through the preaching of Martin Luther and his followers that by the time of Luther's death in 1546, religious change had been initiated in large parts of Germany and beyond. In response to the challenge of the reformers, the first session of the Council of Trent in 1546 had decreed that "preaching is the chief duty of

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

There are no references for this article.