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Subcoracoid Impingement – A Global View

Subcoracoid Impingement – A Global View AbstractModifications in joint anatomy on both soft and bony tissue level play a key role in subcoracoid impingement syndrome. The diagnostic is primarily clinical and is based on patient history and functional tests. Imaging tests support, but do not establish the diagnostic. Approach can take the form of targeted exercises with progressive load, or that of invasive surgery.Shoulder pain has a diverse etiology which derives from the complex local anatomy which includes the clavicle, acromion, coracoid process and humeral head, the soft tissues surrounding this area, in particular the rotator cuff, but can also be unrelated to all of the above and be a reflection of a pathology located in the neck, arm or trunk, or adjacent visceral organs. More often, it is the manifestation of a traumatic episode or an anatomical anomaly, or it can be secondary to inflammation, tumors, or surgery.It is the third most common musculoskeletal complaint presenting to physiotherapy, and largely impacts both an individual’s quality of life and the public health system.Coracoid impingement syndrome can present itself as a cause of rotator cuff disease, but its role is not fully established yet. It is less prevalent than subacromial impingement, can coexist with it, and therefore should be considered into the differential diagnosis of anterior shoulder pain when a patient presents themselves with activity related anterior shoulder pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ARS Medica Tomitana de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 Simina-Georgiana Barbu et al., published by Sciendo
ISSN
1841-4036
eISSN
1841-4036
DOI
10.2478/arsm-2020-0018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractModifications in joint anatomy on both soft and bony tissue level play a key role in subcoracoid impingement syndrome. The diagnostic is primarily clinical and is based on patient history and functional tests. Imaging tests support, but do not establish the diagnostic. Approach can take the form of targeted exercises with progressive load, or that of invasive surgery.Shoulder pain has a diverse etiology which derives from the complex local anatomy which includes the clavicle, acromion, coracoid process and humeral head, the soft tissues surrounding this area, in particular the rotator cuff, but can also be unrelated to all of the above and be a reflection of a pathology located in the neck, arm or trunk, or adjacent visceral organs. More often, it is the manifestation of a traumatic episode or an anatomical anomaly, or it can be secondary to inflammation, tumors, or surgery.It is the third most common musculoskeletal complaint presenting to physiotherapy, and largely impacts both an individual’s quality of life and the public health system.Coracoid impingement syndrome can present itself as a cause of rotator cuff disease, but its role is not fully established yet. It is less prevalent than subacromial impingement, can coexist with it, and therefore should be considered into the differential diagnosis of anterior shoulder pain when a patient presents themselves with activity related anterior shoulder pain.

Journal

ARS Medica Tomitanade Gruyter

Published: May 1, 2020

Keywords: subcoracoid impingement syndrome; shoulder; anatomy

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