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Sovereignty, the Rule of Recognition and Constitutional Stability in Britain

Sovereignty, the Rule of Recognition and Constitutional Stability in Britain SOVEREIGNTY, THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND CONSTITUTIONAL STABIOTY IN BRITAIN Norman Barry'^ 1. Introduction It has been suggested that Great Britain has during the last two decades been experiencing a revolution in her constitutional arrangements. It is not, of course, a revolution that has been brought about by violence yet the changes to the legal and political systems that have occurred are likely, it is claimed (especially by hostile critics), to be more effective and long-lasting than any produced by force. The most important feature of this revolution is the alleged loss of sovereignty consequent upon entering the European Community. The further development of European institutions away from a loose organisation of nations held together by treaty law, which so far has limited domestic applicability, towards a much more integrated European political structure whose laws (and policies) will systematically displace those of the member states has already caused political concern in Britain. There is considerable evidence that significant portions of both the political elite and the public at large view these processes with some disquiet. The new procedures are some distance from becoming fully "internalised", or even understood, by both the public and segments of the political "class". http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

Sovereignty, the Rule of Recognition and Constitutional Stability in Britain

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1993-0107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SOVEREIGNTY, THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND CONSTITUTIONAL STABIOTY IN BRITAIN Norman Barry'^ 1. Introduction It has been suggested that Great Britain has during the last two decades been experiencing a revolution in her constitutional arrangements. It is not, of course, a revolution that has been brought about by violence yet the changes to the legal and political systems that have occurred are likely, it is claimed (especially by hostile critics), to be more effective and long-lasting than any produced by force. The most important feature of this revolution is the alleged loss of sovereignty consequent upon entering the European Community. The further development of European institutions away from a loose organisation of nations held together by treaty law, which so far has limited domestic applicability, towards a much more integrated European political structure whose laws (and policies) will systematically displace those of the member states has already caused political concern in Britain. There is considerable evidence that significant portions of both the political elite and the public at large view these processes with some disquiet. The new procedures are some distance from becoming fully "internalised", or even understood, by both the public and segments of the political "class".

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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